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'Inside Out' secrets: Disney reveals 20 things you may not know

Disney Pixar's "Inside Out" won the 2016 Golden Globe award for best animated film. And it's no wonder why. Parents and kids alike got a glimpse into emotions and what goes on inside a child's mind.

The movie follows 11-year-old Riley and her five Emotions led by energetic, fun-loving Joy (voice of Amy Poehler), Fear (voice of Bill Hader) heads up safety, Anger (voice of Lewis Black) makes sure everything is fair, Disgust (voice of Mindy Kaling) prevents Riley from getting poisoned, and Sadness (voice of Phyllis Smith), who isn't exactly sure what her role is, but she wants nothing but the best for Riley. When Riley's family is relocated to San Francisco, the Emotions work to help her through the difficult transition.

If you think you know everything there is to know about "Inside Out" you may want to think again. Disney shares 20 secrets and fun facts about the movie.

Riley was inspired by the director's daughter

Director Pete Docter's daughter, Elie, was the voice
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Director Pete Docter's daughter, Elie, was the voice of young Ellie in "Up," who was a lot like the character at the time. "But by the time we started 'Inside out,' Elie was older -- about 11 -- and she'd become quiet and withdrawn," Docter said. "It made me think, 'What's going on in her head and why is she changing?' " Ultimately, the idea of emotions as characters sparked the story of "Inside Out" -- with Docter's daughter as the inspiration for Riley, an 11-year-old, hockey-loving Midwesterner.

Check out the Pizza Planet truck

Nearly every Disney Pixar film features the Pizza
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Nearly every Disney Pixar film features the Pizza Planet truck from "Toy Story," a nod to the studio's first film. You'll see the truck several times during "Inside Out," including in one of the memory balls in the foreground (look closely, you'll see it).

Pixar filmmakers did their homework

The filmmakers, artists and storytellers wanted to understand

The filmmakers, artists and storytellers wanted to understand how the mind works and study memories, human emotions and how they evolve during adolescence, so they worked with scientists, neurologists, psychologists and other experts.

Psychologists claim there are as many as 27 emotions

Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

"Some psychologists claim there are as many as 27 emotions," Docter said. As "Inside Out" was being developed, filmmakers weren't sure which emotions should make the cut. "We toyed with adding Pride," Docter said. "Or schadenfreude, who delighted in the pain of others. But it started getting crowded in there so we ultimately settled on five."

The 'Luxo Ball' makes an appearance

The
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

The "Luxo Ball," Pixar's yellow ball, appears in several films, including a flashback scene in "Inside Out" featuring a young Riley and Bing Bong.

The birds are from a previous Disney film

During Riley's move to San Francisco, the small
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

During Riley's move to San Francisco, the small birds perched on the telephone pole lines are actually the stars of "For the Birds," production designer Ralph Eggleston's 2000 short film.

'Ratatouille' stars appear in 'Inside Out'

The magazine in the basket on the coffee
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

The magazine in the basket on the coffee table (pictured above) features Colette from "Ratatouille." You'll also see Remy in one of Riley's nightmares.

Games reference other Disney films

Take a look in the upper right background
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Take a look in the upper right background in Imagination Land. You'll see a board game called "Find Me!" featuring a fish that looks just like Nemo. The "Finding Nemo" game is sitting atop another game called "Dinosaur World," referencing Disney's 2015 movie "The Good Dinosaur."

Oliver Hardy, Jackie Gleason and John Candy influenced Bing Bong

Bing Bong is Riley's imaginary friend who is
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Bing Bong is Riley's imaginary friend who is made out of cotton candy. "He has a nougat-y center, which we never really see, and shape-wise he's part cat, part elephant and -- according to him -- part dolphin, which is a little sketchy," Docter said. "He's basically an amalgam of all the things we loved as kids." The animation team used references from Oliver Hardy, Jackie Gleason and John Candy to nail down the character, according to Docter. The team also borrowed an early version of some technology that's being built for an octopus in "Finding Dory" to deal with Bing Bong's trunk.

Riley sees Arlo from 'The Good Dinosaur'

The dinosaur tail, which halts the car on
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

The dinosaur tail, which halts the car on Riley's family road trip to San Francisco, looks to be Arlo from "The Good Dinosaur," a 2015 Pixar film.

A113 code appears in every Pixar movie

The code A113 refers to the former classroom
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

The code A113 refers to the former classroom of John Lasseter, Brad Bird, Pete Docter and Andrew Stanton at the California Institute of the Arts. Here, you can see it written in graffiti on the wall, and it's also the classroom Riley goes into on her first day of school in San Francisco.

'Inside Out' features a nod to Epcot

Figment, the dragon in the portrait (pictured at
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Figment, the dragon in the portrait (pictured at the right), is the mascot of the Imagination pavilion at the Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World Resort.

Riley's dad works for a tech company

Riley's dad works for Brang, a nonsense word
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Riley's dad works for Brang, a nonsense word intended to sound like a startup that would fit in the San Francisco tech scene.

Scenes from 'Up' appear in memories

The background memories on shelves inside and outside
Photo Credit: Disney/Pixar

The background memories on shelves inside and outside of Headquarters are shots from the "Married Life" scene in "Up."

Disgust was inspired by broccoli

Filmmakers decided that green was the perfect color
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Filmmakers decided that green was the perfect color for Disgust (pictured at right). "She's shaped a bit like broccoli," director Pete Docter said. "She emanates from bitterness. When you feed bitter food to babies, they make a face and stick their tongues out to spit out the food. That is the root of Disgust."

Riley's classroom features 'Toy Story' items

The globe (not pictured) in Riley's classroom has
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

The globe (not pictured) in Riley's classroom has been used in all the "Toy Story" films. Additionally, one of Riley's classmates is wearing a camo pattern made up of "Toy Story" characters.

The bumper stickers are from 'Cars'

Some of the background city cars of San
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Some of the background city cars of San Francisco have bumper stickers from Disney's "Cars."

Special technology was created for Joy's eyes

Joy is Riley's main emotion. Her eyes have
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

Joy is Riley's main emotion. Her eyes have at least twice as many controls as any Pixar character before her. It also serves as a light source, casting a yellow-blue glow around her. According to global technology pro Bill Reeves, a whole system needed to be built to achieve the look filmmakers wanted. "We tried dozens of ways of creating Joy's glow and ended up with a volumetric solution," he said. "But since she's in so many scenes, we needed to configure the software to be able to compute it."

If you look closely, you'll see humorous quotes

A sign on a parking meter (not pictured)
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

A sign on a parking meter (not pictured) in San Francisco reads, "Quarters and Dollar Coins or Barter During Burning Man."

'Inside Out' locations have significance

As a tribute to the Walt Disney Family
Photo Credit: Walt Disney Studios

As a tribute to the Walt Disney Family Museum, the filmmakers set Riley's hockey rink in the exact spot where the museum is located in San Francisco.

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