TODAY'S PAPER
42° Good Morning
42° Good Morning
LifestyleFamilyKidsday

Kidsday: Stewart School National Circus Project

Stewart School put on a circus. Our principal, Mrs. Linda Norton, asked gym teachers Crystal Boyd and Dorothy Burke if they wanted to take part in the National Circus Project. They were curious about it and thought it would be fun. So they said yes!

When each class went to gym that week, Mrs. Boyd and Mrs. Burke introduced students to the circus instructors, Greg and Liam. After our gym class time, we had to choose what we were going to do for the circus. Our options were juggling, plate spinning, feather balancing, stilt walking, clowns, acrobats and ripsticks. Then they pulled us out of class to practice our skills. Greg and Liam taught us tricks to help us in the circus show.

In the next gym classes, the kids tie-dyed T-shirts to wear in the circus. Each class got assigned a tie-dye color. Then, it was time for the students to put on the circus for everybody. They were working for one week; the students were bursting with excitement to put on the show.

First, the acrobats went on. They got the crowd all wild for the rest of the show, which was amazing, awesome, cool and fantastic. We had so much fun and hope that Stewart School will carry on this tradition.

For information, visit nationalcircusproject.com


RIPSTIKS IN GYM

We are lucky to be able to bring our ripsticks to gym class. They help with balance and proprioception (self awareness), and they are fun.

Ripsticks will teach you how to ride by telling you what to do and guiding you. The best way to learn is to start on a slightly downhill but smooth road or surface. When we do ripsticking in gym class, the teachers take us outside on the playground. They teach us the steps to stay up and move on it. Also, they teach us that if we give up, we will never get good at what we are trying to achieve. The gym teachers are great at teaching us how to use it.

Ripsticking isn't that hard. You should start by holding onto a rail or someone's arm, then push yourself off when you feel ready and when you have enough speed. Then, you should just start wiggling your back foot and keep your balance. You should keep trying until you get as far as you can. You should keep track of how far you get each time and see if you can beat your longest distance. To help your balance and control, go slowly. Try to avoid sticks, rocks and water. The more you practice, the better you will be.

-- TIMOTHY RYAN AND ANDREW VINCI/Kidsday Reporters

More Family