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How to wear teddy bear coats in style

A new twist on faux fur coats with textures akin to classic toy.

A hooded chocolate-brown take on the teddy bear

A hooded chocolate-brown take on the teddy bear coat is $160 at Anthropologie stores and anthropologie.com. Photo Credit: Anthropologie

It’s not easy leaving your warm and cozy bed to venture outside and brave the winter weather, but one new trend has made that task a whole lot easier: the faux-fur teddy bear coat.

Teddys — made of faux mohair, shearling, alpaca and other long- and short-pile fabrics common in toy teddy bear fur — are trending for those who want to step out in style without leaving the comfort of their blanket far behind.

It's a look spotted on a long list of celebrities including Heidi Klum, Kim Kardashian, Hailey Baldwin, Rita Ora and Izabel Goulart — with some opting for the $4,000 Max Mara version. But good news: These coats can be found at a wide range of prices at Long Island stores and online retailers.

Styles range from classic long coats in single-, double-breasted and wrap styles to bomber and motorcycle jackets. Colors include traditional teddy bear browns, whites and black as well as reds, greens, blues and pastels.

Debbie Farber, owner of The Girls Room women’s clothing store in Woodbury, calls them "squishy” coats. She’s sold them in her store and says they’re particularly popular among fashionistas in their 30s.

“I think the teddy bear coat is something that people see when they walk in and say, ‘Oh my God, I have to have that!” Farber says. “Women in Manhattan and those who are really fashion-savvy really go for it.”

Carrie Tintle, owner of Crinoline Fashion Boutique in Greenport, says she sold out of the teddy coats at her store. “I’m a freak for coats myself and I think they’re [teddys] really warm and cozy — and in the winter it’s all about being cozy,” Tintle says.

And it’s the guys women can thank for this one. Teddys date back to postwar Britain when they were designed to keep wealthy male motorists warm, and they were later embraced by the likes of Salvador Dali, who wore his on a 1936 transatlantic trip to New York, and Mick Jagger, who sported the look in the 1960s.

While there are still some teddy coats out there for men, today's version of the trend is focused on women.

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