LifestyleHome and Garden

Vegetable gardening: common problems

Anthracnose infection on a tomato. The sunken circular

Anthracnose infection on a tomato. The sunken circular depression will darken and grow larger as the disease progresses. Photo Credit: Clemson University - USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org



Home gardeners growing vegetables are by now knee-deep in their routines: weeding, watering, fertilizing and, hopefully, monitoring closely for insects, diseases and critter activity. Here's a little help for identifying some common harmful pests before they have a chance to destroy your crops.

Want to see how to deal with these problems, plus prevent them in the future? READ: Vegetable garden troubleshooting.

Anthracnose infection on a tomato. The sunken circular
Photo Credit: Clemson University - USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org

Anthracnose infection on a tomato. The sunken circular depression will darken and grow larger as the disease progresses.

Anthracnose -- shown here on a watermelon leaf
Photo Credit: David B. Langston University of Georgia

Anthracnose -- shown here on a watermelon leaf displaying brown, irregular shaped lesions, which will split in the center later in development, leaving a hole -- is a pathogen capable of releasing millions of spores per plant per day that can travel long distances, especially during wet weather.

Leaf lesions caused by late blight.
Photo Credit: Cornell Cooperative Extension

Leaf lesions caused by late blight.

If you're seeing small puncture holes in the
Photo Credit: AP

If you're seeing small puncture holes in the bottom portion of the stalk and stems of zucchini, squash, cucumber and muskmelon plants, the culprit is the squash vine borer, a pest that lays tiny eggs along the lower portions of stalks and stem.

Late blight causes lesions along the stems of
Photo Credit: Meg McGrath

Late blight causes lesions along the stems of tomato plants.

Blossom end rot, a fungus caused by calcium
Photo Credit: Handout

Blossom end rot, a fungus caused by calcium deficiency, appears as mushy black spots on the undersides of tomatoes (shown), peppers and eggplants.

Slugs thrive in moist conditions and feed on
Photo Credit: Fotolia

Slugs thrive in moist conditions and feed on leaves and fruit, leaving a slimy trail in their wake. Here, a slug feasts on a hosta leaf.

Rabbits feed their hunger on your garden, which

Rabbits feed their hunger on your garden, which results in chewed-up leaves and even completely eaten plants. Targets include blackberries, raspberries, apple trees, carrots, lettuce, cabbage and many others.

More Lifestyle

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy policy.

OK
Sorry to interrupt...

Your first 5 are free

Access to Newsday is free for Optimum customers.

Please enjoy 5 complimentary views to articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE