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Cold brew and other new coffee to try on Long Island

Sail Away cold-brew coffee is available on tap

Sail Away cold-brew coffee is available on tap at several Long Island gastropubs. Credit: Sail Away Coffee Co.

Sail Away Coffee Co.

Cold brew is the newest darling of the coffee cognoscenti. Soaking beans for up to 24 hours in cold water results in a mellow beverage that’s less acidic than traditional hot-water methods. That’s the theory, anyway. Chris Vetter, owner of Sail Away Coffee Co., found that while “the concept was smooth, easy drinking, too many of the cold brews on the market were astringent and overly strong.”

For his cold brew, Vetter blends Central American and Kenyan beans for a flavor with “different chocolate tones with little notes of cherry at the end.” He sells it both unsweetened and lightly sweetened in 10-ounce bottles that retail for between $3.50 and $4 at about 50 locations including Southdown Markets, North Shore Farms, Iavarone Bros., Suburban Eats (Melville) and Grace’s Marketplace (Greenvale). All locations are listed at sailawaycoffee.com.

Sail Away is also making a splash with its “Nitro” cold brew on tap. The introduction of nitrogen gives the coffee a thick, creamy head. “It’s got the same mouth-feel as a Guinness stout,” Vetter said. Right now, the Nitro is served at Vauxhall in Huntington, Parlay and Press 195 (Rockville Centre), Jackson’s (Commack), Tap & Barrel (Smithtown) and Eat Gastropub (Oceanside). Order it neat, or let the bartender have some fun with it. Vetter has enjoyed it in an “Irish goodbye” with Baileys Irish Cream, or a cold-brew old-fashioned with bourbon, cold brew and The Bitter Truth’s Spiced Chocolate bitters.

East Coast Roast

Recently off the beat, retired NYPD officer Richard Comuniello could not find a cup of coffee to his liking in his hometown of Island Park. He was also a little bored. Comuniello started roasting at home and, about a year later, he purchased a commercial roaster and installed it in a local warehouse. He drafted wife Maryann and son John into the business and dubbed it East Coast Roast.

East Coast Roast shoots for a balanced, not-too-dark roast, relying on the beans to supply all the flavor. Single origin coffees are sourced from Africa (Uganda Be Kidding!, Kenya Dig It?), Indonesia (Frank Sumatra NY NY, Papua Don’t Preach) and South America (Colombia U). Blends include Sweet Dreams Decaf and Moorse Code Espresso.

John, 25, a former television production coordinator, is de facto head of sales and marketing. He sells coffee to about a dozen restaurants and stores including The Clubhouse (Huntington) and Victoria’s Market (Woodbury). A complete list of retailers is at ecroast.com. The coffees are also available online where they cost between $12 and $14 a pound. Order whole beans or specify a grind: automatic drip, espresso or French press.

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