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LifestyleRestaurants

Greenport restaurants: Our favorites

Greenport beckons diners today as readily as it used to lure whalers in the 19th century. The New England-y hub on the North Fork has undergone a boomlet of restaurants, either new or remade, during this decade. And the lively village, where Colonists from Connecticut arrived in the 1600s, so far has resisted full-blown Hamptonization in style and price. Enjoy the harbor view and, with a little imagination, consider what it must have been like during its whaling, oystering and rumrunning eras.

So, take in the antique carousel in Mitchell Park and then make the rounds on Main Street and Front Street. When your appetite calls, here are some eateries to visit.

Claudio’s

Claudio's (111 Main St.): Greenport's oldest restaurant, founded
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

Claudio's (111 Main St.): Greenport's oldest restaurant, founded as Claudio's Tavern in 1870, was under the ownership of the same family for 148 years until it changed hands in 2018. The 2-acre waterfront parcel still includes two casual outdoor eateries, and the more formal Claudio's restaurant retains its vintage style. The traditional seafood menu has been imbued with some of-the-moment dishes, though, such as grilled octopus with olives, capers and tomatoes, a cayenne-laced lobster bisque, and bucatini cacio e pepe. The lobster roll and steamed lobster still star and North Fork oysters can't be any fresher -- some of them are raised literally next door. More info: 631-477-0627, claudios.com 

North Fork oysters served at Claudio's in Greenport.
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

North Fork oysters served at Claudio's in Greenport.

Kon Tiki

Kon Tiki (437 Main St.) takes its name
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Kon Tiki (437 Main St.) takes its name from Thor Heyerdahl's raft, which in 1947 crossed the Pacific Ocean from South America to Polynesia. You'll take a more modest journey at this singular restaurant, which has popped up and taken residence in the very boutiquey Gallery Hotel, which hosts a modern gallery. The theme is Asian-fusion, delivered diverselywith flair. The choices include the now-obligatory tuna poke, fluke carpaccio, hoisin baby back ribs, spring rolls, dumplings, ramen, oyster shooters, seafood stew and kimchi fried rice crowned with a sunny-side-up egg. Dine in or take out. More info: 631-477-4000, galleryhotelny.com

Crab rikitiki dip, king crab, lemon zest and
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Crab rikitiki dip, king crab, lemon zest and panko crumbs with togarashi wonton on the side at Kon Tiki in Greenport.

Port Waterfront Bar & Grill

Port Waterfront Bar & Grill (104 Third St.)
Photo Credit: Madison Fender

Port Waterfront Bar & Grill (104 Third St.) is related to Salt on Shelter Island and serves a summery setting with food prepared by a chef whose résumé includes Nick & Toni's in East Hampton and Gramercy Tavern in Manhattan. The casual spot is suitably eclectic, with broiled oysters competing with Cheddar-filled bratwurst, lobster grilled cheese challenging lobster rolls, spicy tuna tacos vying with an ahi tuna poke, Jamaican jerk hot wings facing off with mussels in Greenport beer broth. Mexican-style street corn paired with chicken complements Cuban shredded pork. Veer Asian with jumbo shrimp tempura and cross borders with a tempura-fried spicy tuna roll. More info: 631-333-2501, portbarandgrill.com 

The Gazebo Bar at Port Waterfront Bar &
Photo Credit: Madison Fender

The Gazebo Bar at Port Waterfront Bar & Grill.

Industry Standard Bar

Industry Standard Bar (45 Front St.) is a
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Industry Standard Bar (45 Front St.) is a citified downtown destination for good beer on draft, many cocktails and the food that goes with them. The vibe is urban and the pace isn't far behind. Industry Standard also boasts a look that would fit neatly into Kings County as well as Suffolk. The cooking ranges from a fisherman's stew to a bulgogi bowl, an "Italian hoagie" to pork belly ramen, Peconic Gold oysters to a chicken-and-red-bean burrito. You'll also be tempted by goat cheese croquettes, chicken wings, tacos and, yes, dim sum that features well-made dumplings. The "Cronut ice cream sandwich" is exactly that, a creation you'll find hard to resist. More info: 631-333-2500, industrystandardbar.com 

Frito Misto, with fried calamari, cod, shrimp, and
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Frito Misto, with fried calamari, cod, shrimp, and lemon aioli at Industry Standard Bar in Greenport.

Crazy Beans

Crazy Beans (2 Front St.) Crazy Beans occupies
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Crazy Beans (2 Front St.) Crazy Beans occupies the corner where the Coronet luncheonette reigned for decades. The new resident keeps much of the ambience and offers sufficiently homey fare so anyone in need of a nostalgia chaser will be content. This is one of three Crazy Beans eateries. The others are in Stony Brook and Miller Place. Expect ample omelets, oatmeal, breakfast burritos, egg sandwiches, French toast, "cheesy" biscuits, corned beef hash and the like. Then, in the afternoon, segue to lunch wraps, Reuben and Cubano sandwiches and the lobster burger, which translates into a short-rib burger blend finished with lobster salad for a casual spin on surf and turf. More info: 631-333-2436, crazybeansrestaurant.com 

Lobster hash is served under two sunny side
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Lobster hash is served under two sunny side up eggs with hash browns and slices of whole wheat toast at Crazy Beans in Greenport.

American Beech

American Beech (300 Main St.): The gracious, beech-shaded
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

American Beech (300 Main St.): The gracious, beech-shaded structure that anchors Stirling Square (most recently Main, and before that, North Fork Oyster Co.) is now American Beech Restaurant & Inn. The dining room has been completely overhauled and five luxurious guest rooms have been installed on the building's second floor. Under the direction of chef Kyle Strong Romeo, the new American menu landed American Beech onto Newsday's Top 10 Fine Dining restaurants. More info: 631-477-5939, americanbeech.com 

Grilled tuna with scallion fried rice, five-minute egg,
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Grilled tuna with scallion fried rice, five-minute egg, bok choy, avocado and sesame chili sauce are served at American Beech in Greenport.

Barba Bianca

Barba Bianca (102 Main St.): In 2017, Barba
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

Barba Bianca (102 Main St.): In 2017, Barba Bianca took over the Preston's Wharf structure that, for the prior 12 years, had been Scrimshaw. Proprietors Frank DeCarlo and Dulcinea Benson also own the Manhattan Italian restaurants Peasant and Bacaro. Barba Bianca ("white beard") spruced up the premises and serves local seafood whose preparations draw from the coastal traditions of Liguria, Puglia and Sardinia. More info: 631-333-2600, barbabiancany.com 

Spaghetti granchio is served at Barba Bianca in
Photo Credit: Barba Bianca / Zu

Spaghetti granchio is served at Barba Bianca in Greenport.

Lucharitos

Lucharitos (119 Main St.): Newly expanded, this rollicking
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Lucharitos (119 Main St.): Newly expanded, this rollicking taco and tequila bar is named for the colorful Mexican wrestlers known as luchadores. Their fearsome countenances adorn the walls while terrific tacos adorn the plates. Filled with meat, fish, shrimp or even mushrooms, they come cradled in soft-corn tortillas and topped with salsa verde, pickled radish, chopped onion and cilantro. New menu items include Cuban sandwiches and pork huaraches (thick, shoe-shaped tortillas). More info: 631-477-6666, lucharitos.com 

Lucharitos serves traditional-style tacos -- pork, shrimp and
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Lucharitos serves traditional-style tacos -- pork, shrimp and carne asada -- with fresh cilantro, onion, radish and salsa verde on soft corn tortillas.

Bruce & Son

Bruce & Son (208 Main St.): Since it
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

Bruce & Son (208 Main St.): Since it opened as Bruce's Cheese Emporium in 1974, this Main Street fixture has gradually transitioned from a specialty market to the daytime cafe Bruce & Son, whose chef is founder Bruce Bollman's son, Scott. Last year, Scott and his wife, Kassata, did a gut renovation, jettisoning the last remnants of retail, and have re-established the business as a modern breakfast-brunch-lunch spot that uses as much local produce as possible. Dishes include avocado toast with dill, pecorino and poached eggs; steel-cut oatmeal with fruit and local bee pollen; lemon-ricotta pancakes; pressed sandwiches; short rib banh mi; and shrimp burgers. Soups, salads, sandwiches and egg dishes between $8 and $14. On Saturday nights, Bruce & Son hosts a restaurant pop-up helmed by North Fork chef and snail rancher Taylor Knap. Called PAWPAW, it features food that is "farmed, fished, and foraged on Long Island." The menu changes weekly. There are two seatings for the $60 prix fixe, at 5:30 and 8:30, and reservations are required. More info: 631-477-0023, bruceandsongreenport.com

Avocado toast on multigrain bread, purslane, pecorino, two
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

Avocado toast on multigrain bread, purslane, pecorino, two poached eggs and salmon served at Bruce & Son in Greenport.

Basso Cicchetti e Specialita

Basso Cicchetti e Specialita (300C Main St.): Take
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Basso Cicchetti e Specialita (300C Main St.): Take a stool at the bar, order a glass of prosecco and ask owner Nick DeCillis to shave off some paper-thin slices of Italian prosciutto or Spanish chorizo at Basso Cicchetti e Specialita, a wine bar-delicatessen that has taken up residence in the town's rejuvenated Stirling Square. "Cicchetti" (pronounced "chih-KET-tee") is the Venetian word for little snacks consumed with wine and, in fact, a leisurely snack with a glass of wine is the main event here. DeCillis serves about eight wines by the glass, and slices cured meats and cheeses from Italy, Spain and the United States. The shop also sells a small but well-chosen selection of dried pasta, olive oil, canned fish and jarred peppers. More info: 631-333-2175, bassogreenport.com 

Piatto per due (plate for two) includes three
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Piatto per due (plate for two) includes three types of salumi, two cheeses, mixed olives and Calabrian hot peppers at Basso Cicchetti e Specialita in Greenport.

1943 Pizza Bar

1943 Pizza Bar (308D Main St.): Matt Michel
Photo Credit: Aaron Zebrook

1943 Pizza Bar (308D Main St.): Matt Michel started off as an itinerant pizzaiolo, driving his mobile "Rolling in Dough" wood-burning oven around Long Island. In 2014, he set up shop in Greenport's Stirling Square and named his pizzeria after the 1943 K-6 International Harvester truck that had once been his only place of business. (The truck is still available for catering.) This casual spot -- with tables both inside and out -- is a favorite of locals and tourists. Try the New Haven pizza, with its "curiously good" topping of buttery mashed potatoes. More info: 631-477-6984, rollingindoughpizza.com 

A pizza with tomato and fresh mozzarella is
Photo Credit: Newsday / Erica Marcus

A pizza with tomato and fresh mozzarella is served at 1943 Pizza Bar in Greenport.

Olive Branch Restaurant & Café

Olive Branch Restaurant & Café (120 Front St.):
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Olive Branch Restaurant & Café (120 Front St.): In 2017, Michelle and Yusuf Alptekin took over three storefronts in the shopping center across Front Street from Mitchell Park for their ambitious eatery-market. The menu blends traditional Turkish recipes with French, Italian, Greek and American influences. There's hummus, baba ghanoush and stuffed grape leaves, but quinoa fills in for bulgur in an Anatolian soup, and kale stars in one of the tarators, a yogurt-based appetizer. In addition to grilled kebabs are Mediterranean chicken burritos and lamb Bourguignon. In fine weather, Olive Branch Café offers outdoor seating in the brick-paved plaza. Tables are shaded by giant umbrellas, and the charmingly mismatched dishes are served on huge brass trays. More info: 631-333-2444, olivebranchgreenport.com 

Stirling Sake

Stirling Sake (477 Main St.): The gracious corner
Photo Credit: Newsday/Corin Hirsch

Stirling Sake (477 Main St.): The gracious corner location that used to be Vines & Branches has been transformed into a stylish spot specializing in sake and sushi. As the name suggests, chef-owner Yuki Mori, who used to manage the Manhattan sake bar Decibel, is serious about rice wine. His list hopscotches through multiple styles and is dotted with unusual choices, such as an earthy, gently sweet sake from Hiroshima called Kamoizumi Kome Kome. Sushi chef Akio Kon presides over a sushi bar focusing on omakase (chef's choice), but before you dive into raw fish, don't overlook the izakaya-type snacks. Kaburamaki, or slivers of salmon, shiso and avocado wrapped in paper-thin turnip, is dotted with spicy miso sauce; if tempura cod is a special, grab it. Ramen, udon and donburi (rice bowls) round out the menu. More info: 631-477-6782, stirlingsake.com 

Little Creek Oyster Farm & Market

Little Creek Oyster Farm & Market (37 Front
Photo Credit: Aaron Zebrook

Little Creek Oyster Farm & Market (37 Front St.): The North Fork is Long Island's U-pick capital; now it boasts the Island's first U-shuck. At Little Creek Oyster Farm & Market, you are supplied with a kit containing a few oyster knives and a knife-proof glove and offered instruction in the art of shucking oysters. Owners Ian Wile and Rosalie Rung also own Little Creek Oyster Farm, which is raising oysters in Hog Neck Bay in Southold. The market features these mollusks, as well as oysters and clams (and pickles, beer and wine) from other local producers. More info: 631-477-6992, littlecreekoysters.com 

Aldo's

Aldo's (103-105 Front St.): When Aldo Maiorana started
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Aldo's (103-105 Front St.): When Aldo Maiorana started roasting beans in Greenport, many of Long Island's artisan roasters still weren't old enough to drink coffee. Since 1987, Aldo's has had numerous incarnations (even a sushi bar), and has moved back and forth across Front Street a few times. The hours are inconsistent, but here's what hasn't changed: Aldo's serves some of the best coffee and biscotti you'll ever have. More info: 631-477- 6300, aldos.com 

First and South

First and South (100 South St.): The casual
Photo Credit: Doug Young

First and South (100 South St.): The casual bar and grill emphasizes local produce and wines. Dine inside or outside //on the wide porchshould this be porch?/rw or shaded patio//doesn't read/rjg and try the accurately described "really good burger" or South Street chowder (with smoked cod, applewood bacon, potatoes and clams), and don't pass up the fine, hand-cut fries with house-made ketchup (Heinz available on request). More info: 631-333-2200, firstandsouth.com 

D'Latte Cafe

D'Latte Cafe (218 Main St.): At this Greenport
Photo Credit: Doug Young

D'Latte Cafe (218 Main St.): At this Greenport institution, owner Frank Purita displays his mastery of myriad culinary arts: classic French pastry (try the croissants and Key lime tarts), fresh Italian gelato, good old American muffins and scones, well-executed sandwiches and soups. Grab a table outside or, if it's open, in a backroom that used to be the insurance office of one Joseph L. Townsend. Purita has turned it into a combination salon-museum with old prints and maps depicting Greenport's history. More info: 631-477-4060

The Frisky Oyster

The Frisky Oyster (27 Front St.): When The
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

The Frisky Oyster (27 Front St.): When The Frisky Oyster opened in the summer of 2002, it spearheaded a restaurant boom that transformed Greenport from a sleepy fishing village into the North Fork's culinary hot spot. The hip decor (not a fish net or lobster trap in sight) and eclectic menu are as lively as ever. Chef-owner Robby Beaver's cooking makes lavish use of local produce and fish. Specialties include oysters "friskafella" with garlic-infused spinach, chipotle and Parmesan aioli, and a dessert billed as "the best key lime pie." More info: 631-477-4265, thefriskyoyster.com 

Salamander's on Front

Salamander's on Front (38 Front St.): Once a
Photo Credit: Doug Young

Salamander's on Front (38 Front St.): Once a little takeout shop off Greenport's major pathways, Salamander's now occupies a bi-level space on Front Street. The new digs have plenty of display cases for chef-owner Claudia Helinski's homemade salads, sandwiches, mains, sides and baked goods, plenty of shelves for her carefully curated specialty groceries and plenty of tables at which to enjoy it all. Fried chicken, which is made to order, is well worth whatever wait there is. More info: 631-477-3711, salamandersonfront.com 

Brix & Rye

Brix & Rye (308A Main St.): Talk about
Photo Credit: Heather Walsh

Brix & Rye (308A Main St.): Talk about an underground location. In the basement of the building adjacent to 1943 Pizza Bar, Matt Michel and master bartender Evan Bucholz have created a convivial speakeasy specializing in craft beers and local wines, small-batch whiskeys, homemade mixers and live music. You can also order a pizza from upstairs. More info: 631-477-6985, brixandrye.com 

Porto Bello

Porto Bello (1410 Manhanset Ave.): A resident of
Photo Credit: Newsday / Joan Reminick

Porto Bello (1410 Manhanset Ave.): A resident of Brewer Stirling Harbor Marina, Porto Bello offers water views (including outdoor seating options) and emphasizes seafood and Italian-American favorites. Selections range from fried calamari and steamed mussels to rigatoni Bolognese, chicken marsala and zuppa de pesce with shrimp, clams, mussels and calamari. More info: 631-477-1515, portobellonorthfork.com 

Noah's

Noah's (136 Front St.): One of Long Island's
Photo Credit: Gordon M. Grant

Noah's (136 Front St.): One of Long Island's top seafood restaurants, Noah Schwartz's restaurant is both a neighborhood magnet and destination spot. The look is slightly industrial, very sleek and in fine weather the dining room spills onto the wide sidewalk of Greenport's main drag. Among recommended dishes: Long Island clam chowder, crab-stuffed deviled eggs (pictured), Tasmanian red crab tacos, warm lobster roll, and fish and chips with Atlantic cod and Greenport Harbor beer batter. More info: 631-477-6720, chefnoahs.com 

Billy's by the Bay

Billy's by the Bay (2530 Manhanset Ave.): This
Photo Credit: Ian J. Stark

Billy's by the Bay (2530 Manhanset Ave.): This casual spot prepares plenty of shellfish, from steamers and oysters Rockefeller to oyster tacos and lobsters up to 4 pounds. Lobster rolls, hot or cold, are available. And if you're on patrol for Cajun-spiced flounder, Billy's has it. More info: 631-477-8300, billysbythebayrestaurant.com 

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