TODAY'S PAPER
87° Good Afternoon
87° Good Afternoon
LifestyleRestaurants

The biggest Long Island restaurant closures of 2018

Here are some of 2018's most notable closings.

Hush Bistro

Hush Bistro, Huntington: This eatery abruptly shut its
Photo Credit: Julia Xanthos Liddy

Hush Bistro, Huntington: This eatery abruptly shut its doors in December, bringing to a close a four-year saga of shifting locations and personnel. Marc Bynum, three-time champion on Food Network's "Chopped," opened the original Hush Bistro in Farmingdale and left the Huntington location in June.

Jema

Jema, Huntington: This elegant, three-level restaurant owned by
Photo Credit: Johnny Milano

Jema, Huntington: This elegant, three-level restaurant owned by Miracle Mop mogul Joy Mangano, closed less than two years after its ballyhooed opening. It received 3 1⁄2 stars in Newsday and was named the top fine dining restaurant of 2016.

Ciao Baby

Ciao Baby, Commack: The family-style Italian restaurant known
Photo Credit: Newsday / Doug Young

Ciao Baby, Commack: The family-style Italian restaurant known for its gargantuan portions and rollicking vibe closed for a renovation of its interior and menu. It eventually reopened under a new name as Prato 850.

Lombardi's on the Sound

Lombardi's on the Sound, Port Jefferson: This North
Photo Credit: James Carbone

Lombardi's on the Sound, Port Jefferson: This North Shore offspring of Mamma Lombardi's in Holbrook and Lombardi's on the Bay in Patchogue, closed after serving southern Italian specialties for 15 years.

Fado

Fado, Huntington: Huntington's sole Portuguese restaurant closed after
Photo Credit: Newsday / Peter M. Gianotti

Fado, Huntington: Huntington's sole Portuguese restaurant closed after seven years. It brought nouveau Portuguese cuisine to the village with dishes such as caldo verde soup, bacalhãu a bras (salt cod tossed with potato, onions, eggs, olives and herbs) and roasted chicken with piri-piri cream sauce.

Barto

Barto, Roslyn: This grand restaurant that took more
Photo Credit: Marisol Diaz

Barto, Roslyn: This grand restaurant that took more than 10 years to build, closed after less than two years of serving eclectic food in a lavish setting. The 140-seat Barto was a passion project with no detail too small, including a dining room accented in reds and purples and a grand ruby-red Venetian chandelier.

Luce

Luce, East Norwich: This airy, stylish Italian restaurant
Photo Credit: Newsday / Robert Mecea

Luce, East Norwich: This airy, stylish Italian restaurant closed after seven years in business. Luce prepared fine cavatelli Bolognese, rigatoni alla Norma, lobster risotto and more.

Dave’s Gone Fishing

Dave's Gone Fishing, Montauk: This popular and respected
Photo Credit: Gordon M. Grant

Dave's Gone Fishing, Montauk: This popular and respected Long Island seafood restaurant with striking sunset views didn't reopen for the 2018 season. It first opened in 2016 at the former site of Fishbar.

Empress Diner

Empress Diner, East Meadow: This family-owned diner closed
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

Empress Diner, East Meadow: This family-owned diner closed after 63 years in business. It reigned locally offering everything from pancakes and waffles, to chicken Parmigiana and prime rib.

One Block East

One Block East, Wantagh: This 3-year-old burger and
Photo Credit: Newsday/Erica Marcus

One Block East, Wantagh: This 3-year-old burger and barbecue spot closed in May and was replaced by Dirty Taco + Tequila, a new eatery with a "street taco" menu and tequila-heavy bar.

Union Prime Steak & Sushi

Union Prime Steak & Sushi, Great Neck: This
Photo Credit: Jeffrey Basinger

Union Prime Steak & Sushi, Great Neck: This eatery on Long Island's "steak row" closed three years after earning 2.5 stars for its updated surf and turf selections. It was known for porterhouse and rib-eye steaks for two, three or four diners; Kansas City strip steak; and filet mignon; as well as colorful sushi rolls and traditional sushi.

Zum Schneider

Zum Schneider, Montauk: This Bavarian-themed restaurant, which was
Photo Credit: Jonathan McPhail

Zum Schneider, Montauk: This Bavarian-themed restaurant, which was an offspring of the East Village eatery, closed after six years. It featured an upbeat style suitable for a beer garden, live music, backless benches, many wursts and the brews to drink with them.

Aria Melanie

Aria Melanie, Bay Shore: This eatery, which opened
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Aria Melanie, Bay Shore: This eatery, which opened in July 2016, graced Newsday's Top 10 Italian list its first year in business. In 2018 it closed and reopened as Bella Vie.

Kitchen A Bistro

Kitchen A Bistro, St. James: This groundbreaking eatery,
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

Kitchen A Bistro, St. James: This groundbreaking eatery, which served ambitious, seasonal cuisine in casual surroundings, closed after 20 years in business.

Ristorante Da Claudio

Ristorante Da Claudio, Glen Cove: This Italian-continental restaurant,
Photo Credit: Alessandro Vecchi

Ristorante Da Claudio, Glen Cove: This Italian-continental restaurant, known for fine service and dishes, closed after four years. It was one of the last major Italian-continental restaurants on Long Island.

Artie's South Shore Fish Market and Grill

Artie's South Shore Fish Market and Grill, Island
Photo Credit: Timothy Fadek

Artie's South Shore Fish Market and Grill, Island Park: This top Long Island seafood restaurant, in business for decades, closed a year and a half after the death of its founder. It was both a restaurant and one of Long Island's best fish markets.

Joe’s Garage and Grill

Joe's Garage and Grill, Riverhead: This barbecue joint,
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

Joe's Garage and Grill, Riverhead: This barbecue joint, which once earned a three-star rating and spot on Newsday's Top 100 restaurant list, closed in March.

Antonette's East Hills

Antonette's East Hills, Roslyn Heights: This Italian restaurant-catering
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Antonette's East Hills, Roslyn Heights: This Italian restaurant-catering hall that opened in 2012 closed when it was seized by the State of New York for nonpayment of taxes.

North Fork Bacon & Smokehouse

North Fork Bacon & Smokehouse, Wading River: This
Photo Credit: Randee Daddona

North Fork Bacon & Smokehouse, Wading River: This cult favorite barbecue restaurant closed after four years in business. In addition to bacon, the shop smoked ribs, brisket, beef short ribs and more.

Caci North Fork

Caci North Fork, Southold: Newsday's top Italian restaurant
Photo Credit: Daniel Brennan

Caci North Fork, Southold: Newsday's top Italian restaurant for 2018 closed for the season in October. Since it opened four years ago in Southold, it has been a fixture on our Top 100 list, thanks to chef Marco Pellegrini's contemporary take on traditional Italian cuisine.

Black & Blue Seafood Chophouse

Black & Blue Seafood Chophouse, Huntington: This fish
Photo Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara

Black & Blue Seafood Chophouse, Huntington: This fish and steakhouse, which occupied the prime spot in the town's Village Square shopping center since 2008 closed in October.

Primal Roots Organic Cafe

Primal Roots Organic Cafe, Smithtown: This cafe, which
Photo Credit: Newsday/Corin Hirsch

Primal Roots Organic Cafe, Smithtown: This cafe, which served dishes based on the paleo diet and used mostly certified organic ingredients, closed after four months in business.

The Crispy Pig

The Crispy Pig, Sea Cliff: This exuberant gastropub,
Photo Credit: Yvonne Albinowski

The Crispy Pig, Sea Cliff: This exuberant gastropub, which opened in 2016, closed and was sold to Roberto Occhipinti, a well-traveled chef who served as sous chef at Huntington's late, lamented Jema.

Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery

Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery, Farmingdale: This Hooters
Photo Credit: Tilted Kilt

Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery, Farmingdale: This Hooters competitor closed its only Long Island location after 13 months in business. Its 5,450 square feet of space was manned by female servers (called "entertainers" by the chain) in tartan push-up bikini tops and mini-kilts, who served beers, burgers and sandwiches in the glow of 45 large-screen televisions. Kilt-clad men ("kilt guys") filled a few supporting roles as bartenders, barbacks and busboys.

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

Latest reviews