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An optimistic outlook can mean longer life, study says

Researchers at the University of Illinois found that

Researchers at the University of Illinois found that people who were most optimistic were twice as likely to be in "ideal cardiovascular health" compared to people who were generally pessimistic. Photo Credit: iStock

If you have a positive outlook on life, you might live longer.

Researchers at the University of Illinois found that people who were most optimistic were twice as likely to be in "ideal cardiovascular health" compared to people who were generally pessimistic. The study looked at about 6,000 adults ranging in age from 45-84. Participants' heart health was assessed using several measures, including blood pressure, body mass index, blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Optimism and pessimism was scored using various mental health surveys.

The optimists had far better cholesterol levels and also tended to be more physically active. Researchers said the differences in cardiovascular heart health between the two groups "translates into a significant reduction in death rates" for the optimists.

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