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The dangers of driving and talking on cellphones

The National Safety Council notes that talking on

The National Safety Council notes that talking on a cellphone, even using a hands-free device -- such as an earpiece, a dashboard system or speakerphone -- creates a major distraction. Credit: iStock

Holding a cellphone to your ear and making a call while driving is not only against the law, it raises your risk of getting into an accident. Using a cellphone with a hands-free device to make calls while driving is not against the law, but it also raises your risk of getting into an accident.

The National Safety Council notes that talking on a cellphone, even using a hands-free device -- such as an earpiece, a dashboard system or speakerphone -- creates a major distraction. Drivers talking on a cellphone can miss 50 percent of what's happening on the road because their concentration is disrupted. This is especially true the older you get, because normal changes in the brain sometimes make concentration harder. Talking on the phone while driving -- even using a hands-free headset -- also narrows your field of vision.

The council has an infographic on driving and cellphones at nwsdy.li/handsfree.

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