A former Holtsville man drove from Florida last year to kidnap his attorney — Suffolk Conservative Party Chairman Frank Tinari — because he felt he should have won more money in a personal injury lawsuit, police and prosecutors say.

After his arrest on March 27, 2015, Glenn Terry, 49, told police what he wanted to do to Tinari, according to State Supreme Court Justice Fernando Camacho, who on Tuesday summarized police testimony from a pretrial hearing last week.

“He wanted to duct tape and handcuff him and take him to his father’s basement in Holtsville, to get his day in court,” Camacho said, describing the testimony.

Terry told police he wasn’t going to hurt Tinari, but just wanted to soak him in gasoline so he’d understand what Terry was going through, the judge said.

Police arrested Terry after they noticed a Taser cartridge during a traffic stop. He told them he also had a 9-mm pistol, and then police also found pepper spray, duct tape, handcuffs, a barking dog, a gas can, an assault knife, court documents, a megaphone and $5,000 in cash, which Terry told them would be used for bail if necessary, Camacho said.

Terry is being held on bail of $5 million cash or $10 million bond. His arrest ended a years-long relationship between the two men.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

In Central Islip on Tuesday, Camacho ruled that Terry’s arrest was proper and the statements he made to police would be admissible at his trial next month on charges of second-degree attempted kidnapping and five counts of criminal possession of a weapon.

Camacho said police pulled over Terry because he had left a hotel known for prostitution and drug activity in his grey Lexus with Florida license plates, made two turns without signalling and was speeding.

After Terry told police about the handgun, they say he told them, “I was going to kidnap my attorney, Frank Tinari,” according to Camacho. Terry then gave officers permission to search his car and Room 341 at the La Quinta Inn in Bohemia.

Police said Terry eagerly told them his story for about 45 minutes. They barely had to ask a question, Camacho said.

Terry told police that Tinari had wronged him, according to the judge.

“He felt Tinari took his future from him,” Camacho said.

Tinari won Terry a $450,000 settlement for a personal injury lawsuit in 2008. “He wanted a lot more,” Assistant District Attorney Peter Timmons said Tuesday.

Terry sued Danisi Fuel Oil Company in 2002 after he fell into a bathtub at his home and got scalded. He claimed the hot water system was improperly installed.

The suit was dismissed, but after it was reinstated by an appellate court, Tinari said he negotiated the settlement at mediation. He said Terry was unhappy with it and tried to back out of it, but ultimately agreed to take the money after he was advised that a jury was just as likely to give him nothing as it was to give him more money.

Terry told police he moved to Florida, in part because it was possible to get weapons legally there. Tinari said he stayed in touch with his former client, but had no idea he’d come back to Long Island.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

“I got a call after he was arrested,” Tinari said. “I was shocked.”

At the hearing, defense attorney Marc Gann of Mineola argued that the police may have pulled over Terry for some reason other than the traffic violations, but Camacho said that as long as the violations happened, the stop was proper.

Timmons said police confirmed Terry’s story of staking out Tinari’s Central Islip office with cell phone location data and surveillance video.