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DA: Seaford CPA indicted in another theft

Scott Meyer, 48, of Seaford, at court in

Scott Meyer, 48, of Seaford, at court in Riverhead on Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Photo Credit: John Roca

A Seaford certified public accountant was charged Tuesday with stealing $30,000 from a client, seven months after he was indicted, accused of bilking three other clients out of $800,000.

Scott Meyer, 48, a former partner of the Johnson and Meyer accounting firm in Huntington, was arraigned on charges of third-degree grand larceny and two counts of first-degree falsifying business records, according to the Suffolk County district attorney's office.

His attorney, David Besso in Bay Shore, said Meyer was accused of stealing $30,000 from one of his accounts, Nob Hill Condominiums in Ronkonkoma, but has denied doing so.

Prosecutors had alleged that a financial forensic expert hired to pore over the books had discovered the theft, which occurred some time after his initial arrest in July, Besso said.

Meyer was directed by District Attorney Thomas Spota to surrender Tuesday at the county courthouse in Riverhead to be arraigned. His bail was set at $100,000 cash or $300,000 bond.

Besso said Meyer has an explanation in the cases -- serious health problems.

"Scott has brain lesions and possible brain cancer," Besso said. "We have a valid defense. We'll prove that he had no intent to do any of the things that the DA alleges."

Details from Spota's office were not immediately available Tuesday afternoon, a district attorney spokeswoman said.

Meyer was initially arrested last July, then indicted in December, when he was accused of bilking an 80-year-old Greenport man with dementia out of $150,000, stealing $240,000 from a disabled victim living in an assisted living facility in California, and taking $427,000 from a nonprofit cemetery association in Huntington. He was indicted on six counts of second-degree grand larceny.

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