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Long Island

Day in the Life of Long Island 2019: How it unfolded

From firefighters in training to hundreds of fish flopping in a boat — that's what a day in the life of Long Island looks like. We captured the longest day of the year, and shared your part by including #DayintheLifeLI in your photo and video posts from Friday, June 21 on Instagram.  (Credit: Newsday taff)

From firefighters in training to hundreds of fish flopping in a boat — that's what a day in the life of Long Island looks like.

Follow along live as we capture the longest day of the year, and share your part by including #DayintheLifeLI in your photo and video posts from today on Instagram. (If you're participating, make sure your social media accounts are set to "public.")

5 a.m. - 7 a.m.

7 a.m. - 8 a.m.

8 a.m. - 9 a.m.

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How about we make #DayInTheLifeLI the kickoff to a safe, safe summer? Come along on a visit to @hempstead_town’s Lido Beach to learn more about rip currents - how to avoid and survive them. . . Jase Bernhardt, @hofstrau prof, and his students are looking for input from lifeguards (and who would know more?) on a virtual reality simulation, expected to be rolled out next month to the beach-going public. . We would love for you to join in the action today, tagging your first-day-of-summer posts with #DayInTheLifeLI. . . #firstdayofsummer #summersolstice #longislandlife #summer2019 #newsday #beachlife #longislandlife #ripcurrents #lifeguards #beachsafety #uslifesaving #lidobeachli #virtualreality #simulation

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9 a.m. - 10 a.m.

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Welcome to the Nassau County Fire Service Academy— a two week boot camp like training for probationary firefighters. These 33 probies are at day 5 of their training, which occurs Monday through Saturday 8 hours a day. They’ll spend half the day in class (yes there are tests) learning about how fire works, spreads and how to prepare and the rest outside running through drills. “The goal is to make them safe and efficient firefighters,” said Deputy Fire Chief Ed Kraus, who stressed that firefighters first need to learn to protect themselves during a blaze. The trainees start the day in a 2 minute drill putting on all their gear. Typically occurs outside but with the pouring rain today occurs inside. #dayinthelifeli

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Today, Long Island Jewish Medical Center Nurse Jeffrey Rosa is caring for and monitoring a patient recovering from multiple surgeries. “These are literally the sickest patients in the building here in the surgical ICU,” Rosa said, referring to the intensive care unit for people being prepared and stabilized for an operation or in post-surgery recovery. Most post-surgery patients don’t need to go to the SICU, which is for those with the most serious medical needs. Each nurse here cares for only one or two patients, Rosa today also is the daytime charge nurse for all of the nurses, so he leads nurses’ discussions with physicians and makes staffing decisions. He also is the nurse who would call family members of patients who may be near death, to gently ask them if they want a chaplain or other clergy member to be summoned. “Our job is not just to take care of the patient, but to keep loved ones informed and provide them with comfort and understanding, so they’re being taken care of as well.” #dayinthelifeli

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10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

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This is Marissa Caira. She has been teaching her class for two years now at AHRC and organized this special summer activity for several classes to enjoy. “Our kids are in school all summer long, so we wanted to bring the beach to them,” said Caira, 29. “Since they do have special needs, going to the beach can be a challenge for some of them.” The loud noises — people shouting at the touch of cold water, seagulls — and varying textures, such as stepping from concrete to boardwalk to sand, can be overwhelming for people with autism. With this sensory friendly activity, the children of AHRC can touch sand and water, hear the sounds of the ocean, and even snack on watermelon from the comfort of AHRC’s multi-purpose room. And if they get overwhelmed, they can take a break and color pictures of beach scenes at a table to the side. Here, Marissa shows a student how to use a drum full of beads to experience the sound of crashing waves. #dayinthelifeLI

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11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

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Rachel Maligno has known she wanted to work with animals in some way since she was five years old. When she took a dog grooming class in high school, she knew she had found her passion. She now runs her own business called Woof Woof Mobile Dog Grooming. She travels all over Long Island to groom the dogs in their own homes to ease the nerves of both the dogs and their owners. Her mantra is “Do what’s best for the dogs” and is know for grooming the “reject dogs” that no one else will. Her favorite part of her job is the owners initial reaction when they see their dog’s fresh new look. “I’m a people pleaser, and when I get that great reaction it’s the best feeling.” #DayinthelifeLI

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“Leaving your job is scary,” says Steve Pinto, 31, of New Hyde Park. You take your life savings and try something no one’s ever done before.” Pinto is the founder of RC Motorsports, a company based on Long Island that builds custom remote control cars. “I’ve always been an outdoor kid,” he says. Growing up on Long Long Island, Pinto and his friends raced their Go-Ped scooters, bikes, and cars. “That’s where this really all started, tinkering with those motors.” Building his own cars was a natural next step for the trained mechanic, who used to work for Ferrari-Maserati of Long Island. “It’s tough to start a business on Long Island,” he says. “If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.” #dayinthelifeli

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By car, it takes about 15 minutes to get from Stanley Woods’ home in Roosevelt to his job as a cashier at a Westbury gas station. But with three children to support, and a minimum wage, a car isn’t much of an option. And so each day Woods, 51, gets on the n40 near his home, takes it to Hempstead, and then transfers to the n35. On a good day, his journey takes an hour. “It’s a hassle,” Woods said while waiting for his connection at the Rosa Parks Transit Center. He wears his phone on a mount around his neck so he can pass the time watching television while keeping his hands free. On brutal winter days “you have to stand outside and wait and you’re freezing.” The oppressively hot days that are sure to arrive in the coming weeks aren’t much better, he said. On the first day of summer, he sought shelter from the rain under the bus terminal canopies. “Any weather outside of a clear, sunny day, it’s going to be hard to travel on public transportation,” he said. “It’s a constant struggle.” Woods said he intends on eventually going back to school, learning a trade and finding a “career job.” For now, he’ll continue doing what he must. “It’s a job. It’s not like it’s a happy job or something you enjoy. It’s something you have to go to,” Woods said. “You have to go to work.” #dayinthelifeli

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12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

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Danny Lopez, 40, of Brentwood and pictured in the center of the first photo, joined a few other members of the USA Amputee Softball team who came out to Blue Point Elementary school this morning for an inspirational presentation. They spoke to the children about accomplishing their goals through adversity and treating others with respect. “For me it’s personal to be able to come out and talk to the community that I grew up in,” Lopez said. Lopez was joined by Nick Clark, 38, of Cooperstown and Greg Reynolds, 35, of Dighton, Mass. “Being able to educate and help other people is great,” Lopez said. “It means a lot to bring awareness to the kids to let them know that when they do see other amputees and people with disabilities they’re not star struck and they’re able to just say hello and treat them like a regular person instead of looking at the disability or looking at the amputation.” They’ll be playing in a softball game against Boomer Esiason and others at Ostego Park tonight. #DayintheLifeLI

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All aboard the Music Express! 🎟 🚐 💃🏾Meet Meagan Gross. She's the ride operator bringing you an awesome ride with the latest tunes at Adventureland. She's been doing this for four years so I guess you could call her an expert. When I asked her what her favorite part of her job was she said, "I like that I get to work with children since I want to be a teacher." Gross, 23, is getting her M.A. in Early Childhood Education at Adelphi University in Garden City. She said her favorite coaster is the Rattlesnake but her favorite ride to work at is the Music Express. "It's good exercise," she said 🏋🏾‍♀️. After she grabs your backpack and buckles you in, you'll be good to to go. Hands up! 🙆🏾‍♀️🎉 #DayinthelifeLI @newsday #adventureland

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Miss Roseann Malizia attended Manhattan and Queens colleges where she studied childhood and special education. Immediately after graduating, she landed a teaching job at PS 109 in the Bronx where she taught third, fourth and fifth graders for nearly 10 years. Just this school year, Miss Malizia started teaching fifth grade at Lindell Elementary in Long Beach. “I knew I wanted to be a teacher because when I was in grammar school I struggled to read and write and needed extra help. I realized that there had to be a different way to teach students. I felt like I never got the help I needed. Everything was the same for every child. School should be different for every child, according to their needs.” #dayinthelifeli #lindellelementaryschool

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Jennifer Conti, 23, of Franklin Square, has been at a family member’s bedside in the surgical intensive care unit of Long Island Jewish Medical Center for nearly two weeks after she underwent multiple surgeries. “I’ve been sleeping here,” Conti said, a cushioned chair covered in white sheets, a grey blanket and pillow behind her. “I usually go home for an hour to shower, eat and go back.” Nurse Jeffrey Rosa is taking care of her family member — who we’re not identifying because she is not in a condition to give consent — today. Conti said the surgical ICU nurses “have been over-the-top, very informative and helpful. They ask if I’m OK. Every hour they ask if I’m eating, is there anything you want?” Conti’s family member had been heavily sedated for most of the past two weeks, but last night, a nurse reduced the amount of sedation, allowing for more back-and-forth communication. “She can’t speak because of the tubes in her throat,” Conti said. “But I’ve been talking to her and she understands me. Last night I asked her if she’s getting better, and she mouthed ‘yes.’ If she’s feeling good, I’m feeling good.” #dayinthelifeli

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Marissa Caira, second from the left, with her class at the Brookville Center for Children’s Services. Caira said she’s happy to bring the beach to her students, who are in school all summer long. She wants them to feel relaxed and have fun while also learning about some classic summer activities. While each class came in to try out the sensory stations, Caira would welcome them and facilitate conversations. She said she was surprised that all of the students seemed to enjoy the activity. “You never know if they’re going to be overwhelmed by something,” she said. “But here, they can take a breath.” Some of the individuals used noise-canceling headphones, while others colored pictures off to the side once they were finished or if they wanted to rest. After the activity was over, Caira’s students went back to their classroom with their aides to take a break while she helped clean up in the multi-purpose room. One of her students has her 13th birthday today, so their plan for the rest of the day is to celebrate that and wrap up their beach lesson. “I definitely want to do [the activity] again, with every season, just to get all the kids together.” #dayinthelifeLI

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1 p.m. - 2 p.m.

K-9 Officer Matthew DeWitt and his dog Officer Champ in Brookhaven train how to locate a lost child.

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(3/3) #dayinthelifeli @newsday Then there’s John’s employees, who have their own stories to tell. “I’ll show you my x-rays, I look like terminator,” says Joseph Ortiz, 30, of East Islip. Today, Ortiz is a patient care specialist at The Botanist, walking patients through the products and checking in on them. But in 2007, he was an EMT and firefighter in West Islip. One July night, he was struck by a drunk driver outside the firehouse and “left for dead.” He spent a month in the hospital. To date, he’s had two dozen surgeries. The pain was incredible. But as an EMT, he was also wary of long term opioid use. That’s where cannabis came in. He started as a patient under California’s program, before the state required patients to be California residents. Now, it’s a career, something he wasn’t sure he’d have again after the crash. He tears up when he talks about it. “It feels like I hit the lotto, but I’m still working,” he says. It’s also more rewarding in some ways than his EMT work. Before, he was only treating the worst of a patient’s condition. Now, he gets to see people improve. It’s what he loves most. “We have patients that come in looking ill,” he says. “Weeks later, they’re looking like they just came back from vacation. They have color.”

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Gotta give it to those lifeguards. This guy escaped the virtual rip current in no time. It’s virtual reality, though, so what he was seeing through goggles was more detailed than what we were seeing on the screen. . This is beta testing being done by @hofstrau prof Jase Bernhardt, before the beach-safety simulation is rolled out next month to beach-goers, themselves. . . @hempstead_town lifeguards today were giving it a preview to share thoughts, suggestions. Their common reaction? “Cool” “cool” “cool.” And, In case you were wondering, not one of them drowned! . . For me, a fascinating way to spend #DayInTheLifeLI. See link in my bio for Newsday’s Day in the Life rundown. And, feel free to join in the fun, tagging your posts with #DayInTheLifeLI. . . #firstdayofsummer #summersolstice #longislandlife #summer2019 #newsday #beachlife #longislandlife #ripcurrents #lifeguards #beachsafety #uslifesaving #virtualreality #simulation #breakthegripoftherip

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Bernard Williams hopes his NICE Bus fare is an investment in his future. The 56-year-old Uniondale resident has been out of work for a month. And so, as he does most days, he spent the first day of summer crisscrossing Long Island by public transportation, job hunting. “You’ve got to do what you’ve got to do. You can’t give up,” said Williams as he waited at the Rosa Parks Transit Center in Hempstead on his way to a Home Goods store in Rockville Center, where he has a connection. It’s been a difficult few years since Williams injured his back falling off a ladder at his last steady job at a hardware store. He’s been collecting disability, but is feeling well enough to return to the workforce part-time. “I’m feeling down. But I’m trying to keep my spirits up,” Williams said. “Once I start working, I’ll feel better. It makes you feel good—working, getting a paycheck.” #dayinthelifeli

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Dudley Music @dudley_music is trying out some new songs at @dreamrecordingstudios in Bellmore, getting ready for some upcoming high-profile gigs. The Brentwood singer-songwriter will show off his combination of hip-hop and jazz on Day 2 of the @greatsouthbaymusicfestival in Patchogue. He’s set to open for his heroes @bonethugsnharmony_ at @BrooklynBowl. He’s also set to headline @rockwoodmusichall on the Lower East Side. And that’s on top of the monthly hip-hop/jazz night he hosts at Treme in Islip. “We have such a rich history and culture, but we don’t always pay attention to it,” Music says. “I truly believe that hip-hop and jazz are an integral part of Long Island. I think we need to recognize that and help it flourish. I can’t do that if I’m in Brooklyn. And this is always going to be home for me.” #DayInTheLifeLI

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(2/3) For more #dayinthelifeli, check out @newsday. Meet John Burns. He’s the pharmacist at The Botanist. It’s his job to make sure patients are getting the right medication. He was a retail pharmacist on Long Island for nearly 30 years. He helped patients will all sorts of medical issues figure out their medications. In 2014, New York approved medical cannabis. In 2015, a close friend of Burns’ was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. What has kept that friend living life and happy was medical cannabis. Burns says he was inspired to change his career path. He’s very soft spoken and focused on patient comfort. He says there’s still a stigma, even as less regulated but legal CBD grows popular. About half of patients came because The Botanist was closer for them than other dispensaries. The other half is totally new, he says. They may need to come back several times for tours and to get to know the staff before buying anything. “They’ll have a little anxiety, they have some angst. They’re not sure about it,” he says. “I want you comfortable and educated.“

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(1/3) happy #dayinthelifeli from @newsday! Imagine if this is what your doctor’s office looked like. That’s what the staff at The Botanist in East Farmingdale want you to consider. It’s calm inside and staff members are soft spoken for a relaxing, spa-like experience. It’s a sharp contrast to the policy climate surrounding cannabis. Howard Schacter, vp of communications for Acreage Holdings, The Botanist’s parent company, says that’s intentional. They want people focused on wellness, hence the Instagramable “botanist greenhouse” vibe. This is The Botanist’s fourth New York location. The first opened upstate in November, and the Long Island one opened in March. New York is a “no flower” state, meaning the actual plant can’t be sold to customers. Instead, they offer tinctures, pills, vapeable cannabis and more. Everything is highly regulated and tested under state law. It’s hard not to see the impact of state regulations. For example, there’s an ATM in the corner, because with federal rules, there’s no easy debit or credit payment option. “Everything is kind of a grey area because its evolving,” says Brian Sickora, Botanist general manager for New York and New Jersey. “You have to be comfortable with that,” working in this industry. But one big benefit? New York does require a pharmacist on staff. That’s huge for making patients feel safe and heard, Sickora. “It raises the bar.” Check out more over at @newsday.

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Lee Collins spent the first day of summer as he has most others over the last four decades: surrounded by broken televisions. As the proprietor of Universal TV Clinic in Hempstead—one of the few remaining television repair businesses on Long Island, Collins, 80, is an endangered species. Collins, who has owned the business for 41 years, can remember a time when there were a half dozen TV repair shops in Hempstead alone—and he was still doing better business than he does now. He blames the drop in customers on the falling prices of electronics, and the rising popularity of financing. “People didn’t have credit cards, so you had to fix things,” said Collins, who may charge $100 or more to repair and average-sized television. “You can buy one for $150.” But he still gets customers from all over the New York Metropolitan area—some of them collectors looking to buy vintage stereos, amplifiers or VCRs. With his glaucoma worsening by the day, he leaves most of the actual repair work to an employee. But Collins, who owns the building, doesn’t plan to hit the eject button anytime soon. “I like to eat,” he said. #dayinthelifeli

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Bob Biancavilla opened Duck Island Bread Company in 2015 with little professional experience. Since then, Long Islanders have connected with the quaint bakery’s attention to detail, desire to serve the best quality and its kind hearted staff. “The most rewarding thing about this really is the creative process. Everything that we do here makes people smile,” Biancavilla said. Located in Huntington, this bakery is unlike any other on the Island. “We have a million things going on here at once,” he said. “We make everything from scratch.” His small space and small staff do not hold him back from baking perfection each morning. The bakery closes on days in which bakers are prepping in bulk, so that they can get ready for the large crowds that arrive when the shop is open. “We’ll open at 8 and there will be a line into the parking lot until 12.” Customers are attracted to the array of pastries, breads, cookies and pretzels, with bakers trying new recipes daily. “That’s what’s nice about owning a small bakery like this. You can just on a whim, be creative,” Biancavilla said. “When someone comes up with something, we’re like alright- let’s just make it.” #dayinthelifeli

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Susan and Mona are two of the 18 South African penguins from @longislandaquarium and have been a couple for over 12 years. Last year, five new penguins were born, the most in one year for the aquarium. When two of the newly laid eggs were rejected by their parents, Susan and Mona took them in and raised them as their own. “They did a great job raising two adorable kids,” said Aquarium Director of Education, Colette Fardella. She went on to say that she knew Susan and Mona would be great parents and that she was proven right as the couple sat on the eggs to keep them warm. Once the eggs hatched, Susan and Mona fed the babies and looked after them. Now brothers Dwayne and Gru are happy and healthy young penguins thanks to their adoptive moms. #dayinthelifeli

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2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

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#DayInTheLifeLI This castle will be completely transformed for a “Gambol” in just a few hours. In addition to Paul D. Schreiber High School prom co-chairs ToniAnn Nahas and Michelle Alagna, there are about 60 senior parent volunteers who will help out and dozens of other community volunteers. They walked in beverages, vacuumed and set up tables, tablecloths and chairs today. The bleachers arrived, which will be set up for the red carpet. “We just really want to wow the kids,” Nahas said. “We want them to walk in here and be like ‘oh my God.’” The two co-chairs also each have four children, and both of their youngest are getting ready to go to this prom tonight. It’s time for their daughters to get ready. ➡️Swipe to see more scenes from before the prom, and hear more of what the organizers had to say. Check back later for more, and follow the rest of #DayInTheLifeLI at @newsday!

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3 p.m. - 4 p.m.

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The first day of summer may be breezy and cloudy, but still brings all the expectations: sun-filled skies, picnics on the beach, playful splashing in the generous sweep of shores that outline Long Island. . . .We can envision the joy to come, the memories-in-the-making, for friends and families, beginning with this #DayInTheLifeLI. . . .As sure as summer is now officially launched, we also know there will be tragedies that intrude, altering families forever. . . That’s why today was special for me, to get to observe and highlight at least one initiative aimed at keeping those mishaps to a minimum. . . As inviting as Long Island’s waters are, they can also be treacherous. And Jase Bernhardt, @HofstraU professor, was getting help with a virtual reality simulation on beach safety techniques, with a special look at rip currents. . . So, I spent time with him, his student and a group of @hempstead_town lifeguards and other staff, who donned the goggles, gave the tool a try, and provided feedback to make it better. Beach goers, themselves, will get to give it a whirl starting next month. And, at some point, I’ll be there, too. . . So many people are out there, working to keep us safe, including these lifeguards, who get awards for helping to keep lives/families in tact. So glad to have devoted my Day in the Life time to get to know a few of them. . . So, let’s salute those helpers and rescuers, and wish all a delightful and safe summer. Signing off - for now. . . . See link in bio for Newsday’s Day in the Life rundown. . . . . #firstdayofsummer #summersolstice #longislandlife #summer2019 #newsday #beachlife #longislandlife #ripcurrents #lifeguards #beachsafety #uslifesaving #virtualreality #simulation #breakthegripoftherip

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Public transportation for most commuters in Nassau and Suffolk is a way to get to and from work, school or appointments. For others, it is a lifeline. Paratransit systems, like Nassau’s Able-Ride, provides door-to-door transportation for elderly and disabled customers who, in many cases, would otherwise be homebound. In Massapequa yesterday, Chris Gilbert waited patiently as his father’s Able-Ride driver pulled up to his curb, put her mini-bus in park, and began the lengthy process of helping Gilbert’s dad Jesse, 75, disembark. Once a cook, Jesse Gilbert’s health has fallen sharply in recent years, leaving his two sons to care for him. “It’s our dad, so we’ve got to do it,” said Chris Gilbert, 47, who is troubled seeing his father live in pain. “He doesn’t say it. But I’m pretty sure he is.” Three times a week, the sons load their father onto and off an Able-Ride vehicle that takes him to dialysis treatment in West Babylon. For all their frustrations every time his father is picked up late, Gilbert said he is grateful for the service. “I’m glad they help him,” he said. #dayinthelifeli

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Curtis Gray, 57, of East Meadow is known in his neighborhood as “The Robot Man.” Every Halloween he builds giant robot characters in his spare time and puts them on his lawn for decoration. This year Gray will have his own display at Eternal Con at Nassau Coliseum on June 22-23. “I use all recycled parts,” says Gray, who works as a tile contractor. “I find stuff people put out on the curb or in dumpsters and make use out of them.” This weekend Gray will feature robot versions of time traveling toons “Rick and Morty” from Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim. “Rick is 18 feet tall and weighs about 700 pounds,” says Gray. “He’s made out of light fixtures, air conditioner parts, basketball hoop stands, hubcaps, a car alternator, football helmets and auto grills.” #DayInTheLifeLI

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4 p.m. - 5 p.m.

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Jeffrey Rosa loves being a surgical intensive care unit nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center. “You get to have an impact on someone’s life every day,” he said. It can be to save a life — or to compassionately tell somebody that a loved one won’t make it. Doctors often see patients for only five or ten minutes, he said. The rest of the time, “it’s the nurse’s face you’ll see,” Rosa said. “We’re the ones at the bedside all day, every day. We’re the ones interacting with the patients and the families.” It’s a stressful, fast-paced job with sometimes rollercoaster emotions, up when a patient improves and recovers, down when, as Friday morning, a patient dies. Rosa has specialized training as a critical-care nurse for patients who have the greatest medical needs. Last month, he was named one of five nurses of the year for the entire 23-hospital Northwell Health system, cited for his compassion and dedication. Rosa’s 12-hour-plus shift is unpredictable. On Friday at about noon, three of 13 SICU beds were empty. Over the next 50 to 60 minutes, Rosa got word one-by-one that three new patients were arriving within a few hours, and he and other nurses scrambled to prepare for them. “There’s a whole cascade of things that can happen,” he said. “No day is boring.” #dayinthelifeli

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5 p.m. - 6 p.m.

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We’re going to have to make this quick, because it’s almost rush hour at Happy Garden in Oyster Bay--5 to 6 p.m.--and the dumplings still need rolling. During the frenetic period to come, an order of moo shu pork or szechuan beef or shrimp with garlic sauce will fly out the door every four minutes, on average, although in an American Chinese restaurant like this, it’s the sesame chicken they come back for night after night. Ounce for ounce, Happy Garden’s $7.25 version might be the best bargain for miles around. So many glossy, gloppy orbs of caramelized goodness are speckled with seeds and delivered on a nest of electric green broccoli spears, you fear no plastic lid could possibly contain them. But Frances Yang means business, roughly snapping the container closed and sliding it into a #4 brown paper bag, just as she does every day--as in 7 days a week for the past 14 years--alongside her husband Michael. The pair emigrated from mainland China in 1990, ran restaurants upstate and in the midwest, and along the way somehow found time to raise three children. But it was Oyster Bay that captured the family’s heart, in 2005. To hear the Yangs tell it, the North Shore village in which they live and work is among the most welcoming, pleasant on earth. “Everyone here is so happy--that’s why we call it Happy Garden,” Frances says with a loud laugh. That said, she can understand why her 22-year-old daughter studied fashion at FIT (she now works in the city), her 18-year-old son is getting a business degree at SUNY Albany, and her 13-year-old daughter wants to be an artist. “Restaurant working is very hard,” Frances says. “I want them to do other things, to have time for other things.” Frances doesn’t have time for much anything else. Her off-time is brief. “I take a half-day off on Tuesdays.” #dayinthelifeLI #oysterbay #sesamechicken

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6 p.m. - 7 p.m.

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Who gets this excited about offering free samples of salad dressing to people? Erin Ambrose, of Greenport, does. The California native, who has been living on Long Island for the last 15 years, spent her day doing just that on behalf of her employer, Cutchogue’s @saturfarms The business recently launched a line of individually-packaged, single portion organic salad dressings and Ambrose was tasked with introducing the product to customers at the Long Island Welcome Center’s Taste of New York market. “When you have a front row seat to watching how the ingredients that go into a product are grown, with such passion and dedication from the farmers, it’s just really inspiring and motivating,” she said. “I enjoy participating in events like this one, meeting local people and seeing their reactions when they taste the dressings and then reporting back. It’s all still very new and exciting for us.” @erinly87 #dayinthelifeli #saturfarms #farmfresh #organic #longisland #eatlocal #buylocal #cutchogue #greenport #newsday #presspassdaysi

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“A lot of people think being a tattoo artist is like living like a rockstar, parties and stuff like that. But that’s the complete opposite of what I do, I’m the most boring person in the world.” Pauly Conti better known by his artist name Pauly Piff has been a tattoo artist for nearly nine years, being introduced to it at the age of 19. He began working for Salvation South Tattoo for as long as he’s been an artist, starting first as an apprentice under Ryan Gatt who owns Salvation South Tattoo. He described his apprenticeship as being an “amazing” experience, saying that he and his mentor share a lot of the same style. But Piff has been an artist for as long as he can remember, first creating Bob Ross paintings when he was just in first grade. Being a tattoo artist is not about an image he says, “It’s who I am, if I wasn’t doing this I’d be making money painting or drawing.” #dayinthelifeLI

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7 p.m. - 8 p.m.

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Meet Rob Romeo, 34, a #dangerarts performer who lives in an 18-by-6-foot caravan in West Babylon. He holds a B.A. in Spanish and economics. He worked in financial planning until he found his calling. Some of the acts he performs (sometimes with @worldofwonder and @coney.island.usa and monthly at @thewaystation) include comedy magic, bullwhip cracking, knife throwing with a human target, fire eating and breathing, and human blockhead. “This world fell upon me through my interest in Jazz and Americana,” he says. “Vaudeville and Jazz have always had a strong connection, and my love of these aesthetics eventually brought me to #burlesque and the sideshow. At first I was just an emcee, but the last three years I really began focusing on becoming a complete performer. What I love about my passion is that it goes in all directions for me. When you play nine instruments and actively train danger arts, there's always something to do. I get to spend 30 minutes at a piano, then my guitar, then my whips, then my knives, paint something, build a prop. There's always something to chase: some incremental goal, some mad vision, some artist you admire. I add a new discipline almost every month. Some of them still scare me, which motivates me to achieve more confidence. The realm of danger where I take someone else's life in my hands was a whole new beast, and you always live with a healthy fear of that incredible responsibility.” #dayinthelifeli @newsday @twistedcircusny #longisland #art

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8 p.m. - 9 p.m.

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Danny ‘D-Lo’ Lopez made the trip up from his home in West Virginia ready to play ball. After visiting an elementary school in Blue Point this morning he wasn’t sure if he would get the chance to play with his USA softball Amputee teammates. ‘We were kind of bummed out wondering what was going to happen,” Lopez, who had one of his legs amputated above the knee during his stint in the Army that began in 1997, said. “New York is kind of like Virginia, you never know what’s going to happen with the weather and if you don’t like it it’ll change eventually.” It turned out to be a beautiful night at Peter A. Nelson park in Huntington and the Patriots did get their game in against the Boomer Esiason all-stars. The result didn’t turn out the way Lopez had hoped as Boomer and his all-stars pulled out an 18-10 win, but that did nothing to dampen his spirits. “It’s awesome,” he said. “Being able to come out to Long Island - being at home - and supporting a great charity to raise funds for our kids camp is probably the best feeling I can get. This is my favorite event of the year.” #dayinthelifeLI

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