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Long Island

LI programs to end homelessness get $9M from feds

Nonprofits, localities and states can spend the money to “quickly rehouse” individuals and families, and help them become independent, Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to reporters in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Photo Credit: AP

Nearly three dozen Long Island programs working to end homelessness will share $9 million in federal funds, Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand said Thursday.

Nonprofits, localities and states can spend the money provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to “quickly rehouse” homeless individuals and families, and help them become independent, the release from the New York senators said.

“By supporting affordable housing initiatives across New York, and helping organizations work with homeless families and individuals to get them back on their feet, we can make a real dent in homelessness across the state,” Schumer said.

HUD is funneling the new funding — exactly $9,156,647, which will be shared among 33 Long Island groups — through its Continuum of Care Program, which stresses community solutions.

The state received $200,807,611 from this effort; 579 programs around New York benefited, the senators said.

In early December, an annual HUD study found homelessness eased 0.6 percent on Long Island in 2017, but leaped 43 percent in New York State since 2007, the largest increase nationwide.

In Nassau and Suffolk counties, the ranks of people living in shelters or on the street slipped from 2016 to 3,937 in 2017, HUD said.

The federal data are gathered annually on a January night. Nassau’s latest data showed a nearly 22 percent increase in people living in shelters. Experts attributed the rise partly to the county’s high cost of housing.

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