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Joe Librizzi, WWII submariner who rescued aircrews

Librizzi said he was not yet 17 when he enlisted in the Navy. He joined the crew of the Balao, which by then had already been on five combat patrols in 18 months of Pacific war service, in August 1944.

A photo released by the U.S. Army, a
Photo Credit: AP / U.S. Army via Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, HO

A photo released by the U.S. Army, a mushroom cloud billows about one hour after an atomic bomb was detonated above Hiroshima, western Japan on Aug. 6, 1945.

An image of World War II veteran Joe

An image of World War II veteran Joe Librizzi who, along with roughly 80 other submariners, was assigned to the USS Balao during June 1945.

World War II veteran Joe Librizzi at his
Photo Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

World War II veteran Joe Librizzi at his Oceanside home on March 11, 2015. Librizzi talks about his experiences during the closing battles of the war and how it affected his life and the lives of all Americans.

Rubble was almost all that was left in
Photo Credit: AP

Rubble was almost all that was left in Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, after the explosion of the first atomic bomb dropped on Japan.

This aerial photo taken in March 9, 1945
Photo Credit: AP

This aerial photo taken in March 9, 1945 shows the industrial section of Tokyo along the Sumida River. The nuclear bombs dropped by the United States on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 killed about 130,000 people, secured Japan's surrender and ended World War II.

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