Long IslandLI Life

Cpl. Withers' War

Brian Withers shows his father’s portrait of Gen.

Brian Withers shows his father’s portrait of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower on the cover of Army Talks magazine in 1945. Ike sent the illustrator a thank-you note. (July 12, 2012) Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

A vast collection of illustrations created by former Army artist George Withers that portrays scenes from the daily lives of his fellow soldiers during World War II compiled by his son, Brian Withers.

Brian Withers shows his father’s portrait of Gen.
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

Brian Withers shows his father’s portrait of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower on the cover of Army Talks magazine in 1945. Ike sent the illustrator a thank-you note. (July 12, 2012)

George Withers, a “war artist” for the U.S.
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

George Withers, a “war artist” for the U.S. Army, is pictured here at the European Theater of Operations in Paris between 1944-1945. (July 12, 2012)

One of Brian Withers' favorites paintings of his
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

One of Brian Withers' favorites paintings of his father George's from his time serving with the U.S. Army in World War II is this one depicting American troops in Scotland in 1944. (July 12, 2012)

George Withers' work as a “war artist” during
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

George Withers' work as a “war artist” during World War II appears in publications such as Army Talks, Stars and Stripes and Overseas Woman. (July 12, 2012)

An undated painting by George Withers of his
Photo Credit: Courtesy of Brian Withers

An undated painting by George Withers of his wife, Virginia. Withers often wrote to his wife during the war and included sketches of her done from memory.

Envelopes from George Withers' time as a “war
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

Envelopes from George Withers' time as a “war artist” for the U.S. Army are stuffed with letters and small postcards with images depicting the scenes he was seeing while stationed in Europe during World War II. (July 12, 2012)

While working as an artist for the U.S.
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

While working as an artist for the U.S. Army during World War II, George Withers would sometimes illustrate his life overseas for his wife, Virginia, who was back home in New York. (July 12, 2012)

A photograph of George Withers with his son,
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

A photograph of George Withers with his son, Brian, during the boy's childhood. (July 12, 2012)

While in Europe during World War II, George
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

While in Europe during World War II, George Withers would sometimes illustrate his life overseas for his wife, Virginia, who was back in New York. (July 12, 2012)

A collage of paintings and drawings by George
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

A collage of paintings and drawings by George Withers of liberated Paris in the summer of 1945. (July 12, 2012)

Brian Withers, 68, of Merrick explains that while
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

Brian Withers, 68, of Merrick explains that while his father was deployed in Europe during World War II he would sometimes try to add sketches with a hint of humor to his letters home to his family in New York. (July 12, 2012)

In 1944, two of George Withers’ illustrations for
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

In 1944, two of George Withers’ illustrations for short stories by J.D. Salinger were reproduced on covers of the Saturday Evening Post. (July 12, 2012)

A painting of Paris by George Withers. (July
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

A painting of Paris by George Withers. (July 12, 2012)

George Withers was a romantic and showed his
Photo Credit: Nancy Borowick

George Withers was a romantic and showed his love for his wife, Virginia, by painting a portrait from the last time he saw her before shipping out during World War II. (July 12, 2012)

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