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Long IslandLI Life

Spotlighting women in Long Island's past

Natalie Naylor by a portrait of Kate Mason

Natalie Naylor by a portrait of Kate Mason Hofstra, whose legacy led to the creation in 1935 of Hofstra University in Hempstead. Naylor included her in “Women in Long Island's Past.” The portrait hangs in Hofstra Hall. (Feb. 28, 2013) Photo Credit: Jennifer S. Altman

Although Natalie Naylor's book on prominent women in Long Island's history was recently published, its genesis dates back three decades.

Natalie Naylor by a portrait of Kate Mason
Photo Credit: Jennifer S. Altman

Natalie Naylor by a portrait of Kate Mason Hofstra, whose legacy led to the creation in 1935 of Hofstra University in Hempstead. Naylor included her in “Women in Long Island's Past.” The portrait hangs in Hofstra Hall. (Feb. 28, 2013)

Sally James Farnham (1869-1943) was a sculptor who
Photo Credit: Library of Congress, Bain Collection

Sally James Farnham (1869-1943) was a sculptor who had commissions around the world. She is shown in 1921 in her West 57th Street Studio in New York City next to her bust of Herbert Hoover. Earlier in her career, she lived in Great Neck.

Natalie Naylor wrote
Photo Credit: Jennifer S. Altman

Natalie Naylor wrote " Women in Long Island's Past: A History of Eminent Ladies and Everyday Lives." (Feb. 28, 2013)

Rosalie Gardiner Jones (1883-1978) was an Oyster Bay
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Rosalie Gardiner Jones (1883-1978) was an Oyster Bay socialite and suffragist known as “General Jones.“ She graduated from Adelphi College, then a women's school in Brooklyn, later graduated from Brooklyn Law School and took part in the 1913 Suffrage Hike. This photo of her working as an auto saleswoman was taken between 1920 and 1930.

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (Aug. 6, 1861 —
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt (Aug. 6, 1861 — Sept. 30, 1948) was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt and the first lady of the United States during his presidency from 1901 to 1909. She is shown at her desk in this photo taken between 1900 and 1910.

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt was the second wife
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt was the second wife of Theodore Roosevelt. The Roosevelts are shown holding their grandson Richard Derby, who was the son of Ethel Roosevelt Derby (Nov. 3, 1915)

Female pilot Elinor Smith smiles from the cabin
Photo Credit: AP file

Female pilot Elinor Smith smiles from the cabin of her plane after breaking the women's altitude record flying a Bellanca six miles up over Roosevelt Field in Garden City in March 1931. A few weeks before, Smith lost consciousness while attempting to beat the record when her oxygen tubes became disconnected very high up in the air. A New York writer described her latest flight as a “sky-piercing comeback for Elinor." (March 27, 1931)

Alicia Patterson, co-founder and publisher of Newsday, looks
Photo Credit: AP file

Alicia Patterson, co-founder and publisher of Newsday, looks at a copy of the newspaper at her desk in Hempstead. (Sept. 27, 1942)

Elizabeth Oakes Smith (1806-1893) was a poet, fiction
Photo Credit: Handout

Elizabeth Oakes Smith (1806-1893) was a poet, fiction writer, editor, lecturer, and women's rights activist whose career spanned six decades, from the 1830s to the 1880s. This engraving is from Thomas Buchanan Read's popular book “The Female Poets of America,“ 1857 edition. Midcentury, she and her family moved from New York City to Patchogue. (1848)

Margaret Olivia Sage (1828-1918) was an American philanthropist
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Margaret Olivia Sage (1828-1918) was an American philanthropist known for her contributions to education and progressive causes and whose gifts enhanced the two Long Island areas where she had country homes, Sag Harbor and Lawrence. (circa 1910)

Dorothy Melville was a major benefactor in Stony
Photo Credit: The Long Island Museum of America

Dorothy Melville was a major benefactor in Stony Brook and a founder of today's Long Island Museum. This photograph of her is from the 1940s.

Bertha Benkard Rose, left, presents the Society for
Photo Credit: SPLIA

Bertha Benkard Rose, left, presents the Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities' Sherwood Award for preservation of Sagamore Hill to Ethel Roosevelt Derby in 1977. Rose (1906-1982) was a leader in historic preservation and in charge of the restoration of Sagamore Hill.

Alva Vanderbilt Belmont was a prominent multimillionaire American
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Alva Vanderbilt Belmont was a prominent multimillionaire American socialite and a major figure in the women's suffrage movement. She also owned numerous mansions including Idle Hour, now the site of Dowling College; Brookholt in East Meadow, where she operated a school for women farmers; and Beacon Towers in Sands Point, thought to be the inspiration of The Great Gatsby. (circa 1910-1915)

Photographer Mattie Edwards Hewitt (1869-1956) partnered with fellow-photographer
Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Photographer Mattie Edwards Hewitt (1869-1956) partnered with fellow-photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston in New York City to capture “beautiful homes,“ including many of Long Island's estates. This photo was taken between 1890 and 1910.

Ida Sammis Woodruff Satchwell (1865-1943), born in Cold
Photo Credit: Nassau County Museum Collection

Ida Sammis Woodruff Satchwell (1865-1943), born in Cold Spring Harbor, was a prominent early female Republican Party suffragist and politician from Suffolk County. After women gained the right to vote in New York in 1917, she ran for elected office in the November 1918 election, and represented Suffolk's 2nd District in the State Assembly from 1919-21.

Female test pilots at Grumman Bethpage, 1943. From
Photo Credit: Northrop Grumman History Center

Female test pilots at Grumman Bethpage, 1943. From left are Barbara Jayne Kibbes, Elizabeth Hooker and Teddy Kenyon.

Edith Loring Fullerton (1876-1931),
Photo Credit: Nauman Collection

Edith Loring Fullerton (1876-1931), "Lady of the Garden,” was an author, editor, lecturer, educator and a horticultural and agricultural expert. But she was also known as the wife of Hal B. Fullerton, photographer for the LIRR. (circa 1920)

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