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Long Island

Street art across Long Island

Public art is everywhere.

It can be a simple splash of color on a quiet street, or a grand mural stretching across an entire building -- a showcase of painting prowess, or a design to dazzle the passerby. No two pieces are the same, and each is a testimony to the unique culture and history of the place it comes from.

Take a tour of our collection of public art across Long Island, and enjoy the culture that exists right in your own backyard.

What else should we add to this collection? Send photos or ideas to Amy Onorato at josh.stewart@newsday.com.

Hampton Bays

This ocean mural can be found outdoors at
Photo Credit: Mark Harrington

This ocean mural can be found outdoors at Meschutt Beach County Park in Hampton Bays.

Sayville

This colorful whale can be seen swimming along
Photo Credit: Mark Harrington

This colorful whale can be seen swimming along the wall outside of Bunger Surf Shop on Main Street in Sayville.

Riverhead

Photo Credit: Courtesy of East End Arts

"Garden Party," a large hummingbird mural by local artist Caitlyn Shea, has attracted some media attention. The painting was almost put into jeopardy when the building on East Main Street in Riverhead was slated for renovations calling for the mural's removal. Shea started a Facebook page and circulated a petition to help save the mural. The public support prompted building owner Jason Gamba to allow the mural to stay.

Photo Credit: Courtesy of East End Arts Council

"Chameleon Mural," by artist Drew Kane of Huntington Station, can be found along East Main Street in Riverhead. According to the East End Arts Council website, Kane drew inspiration for the piece from a photo of a chameleon living at the Riverhead Aquarium.

This flowery fireplug by Massapequa muralist Arlene McLoughlin
Photo Credit: Courtesy of East End Arts Council

This flowery fireplug by Massapequa muralist Arlene McLoughlin is one of 10 highlighted hydrants along Main Street in downtown Riverhead. Artists across Long Island were chosen by the East End Arts Council to paint the selected spigots as part of their "All Fired Up on Main!" contest in 2014.

Patchogue

This landscape mural can be found on the
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

This landscape mural can be found on the side of a storefront on East Main Street in downtown Patchogue.

Freeport

If you head to the back parking lot
Photo Credit: Composite image by Amy Onorato

If you head to the back parking lot of Freeport Marine Supply on Merrick Road, you are in for a nautical treat. Elaborate seascapes and dockside scenes stretch across the back of the store, and are accented by a lighthouse replica that can be seen from blocks away. The mural was painted by landscape artist Hans Gabali of Northport.

Landscape artist Hans Gabali of Northport is the
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

Landscape artist Hans Gabali of Northport is the man behind this Freeport Nautical Mile mural on the side of the Crabshack on Woodcleft Avenue.

Huntington

This
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

This "monstrous" piece of public art was brought to the Village of Huntington by New York-based graffiti artist Phetus. On his website, Phetus describes his style as "monstrous expressionism," incorporating bold facial expressions with equally vibrant colors to bring emotion to life in the public sphere. Phetus' work is part of the Huntington Arts Council's SparkBoom project, and can be found off Main Street, behind the group's headquarters.

Nestled in the undergrowth behind the Huntington Arts
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

Nestled in the undergrowth behind the Huntington Arts Council building on Main Street is this stunning piece by Bronx graffiti artist Jesse Rodriguez, also known as Sonic Bad. Electric green outlining highlights this droopy-eyed skeleton, who dons a T-shirt blaring the message 'Art Matters.' This piece was developed as part of the Huntington Arts Council's SparkBoom program, aimed to shed light on emerging artists from New York.

Recognize him? That's Jerry Garcia, the late lead
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

Recognize him? That's Jerry Garcia, the late lead guitarist and singer for The Grateful Dead. You can find him playing his music under the stars on the side wall of Stella Blue Bistro, on New York Avenue in Huntington. This mural was completed by Painted Pieces, an art and design studio in Huntington Station.

Some more famous faces: Deceased comedic icons Robin
Photo Credit: Composite by Amy Onorato

Some more famous faces: Deceased comedic icons Robin Williams and Joan Rivers are memorialized in these Warhol-esque murals on the wall outside of Painted Pieces, an art and design studio in Huntington Station.

This large outdoor mural, a vivid landscape depicting
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

This large outdoor mural, a vivid landscape depicting a day in Huntington Harbor, features images of the Huntington Lighthouse and Coindre Hall. The mural was painted between 2010 and 2011 by artists Erich Preis and Jane Spalholz. If you're looking to see the mural up close, it can be found on the side of Gold Coast Lobster on Stewart Avenue in Huntington Village.

Follow the fantastical images painted in glass in
Photo Credit: Composite by Amy Onorato

Follow the fantastical images painted in glass in this 130-foot long installation on the platform of the Long Island Rail Road's Huntington station. According to the Town of Huntington website, artist Joe Zucker used images iconic to life of Long Island to depict different "cars" on his fantasy train.

This dual-sided mural serves as a helpful how-to
Photo Credit: Composite by Amy Onorato

This dual-sided mural serves as a helpful how-to for growers at the Gateway Community Garden on New York Avenue in Huntington Station. The inside mural depicts a calendar showing when different fruits and vegetables should be planted throughout the year, while the outside mural displays a colorful garden scene to be enjoyed by passersby. The murals were designed by artist Lucienne Pererira in 2011.

Great Neck

It looks real, doesn't it? That's exactly what
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

It looks real, doesn't it? That's exactly what artist William Cochran was going for with this trompe l'oeil (fool the eye) piece titled 'A Handful of Keys.' Trompe l'oeil pieces use illusion to trick the viewer into believing the subjects or objects in the painting exist in three dimensions. 'A Handful of Keys' is one of several pieces of this kind that can be found tucked along the side streets of Great Neck Plaza.

Lindenhurst

This historic railroad-themed mural can be found stretched
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

This historic railroad-themed mural can be found stretched across the far wall of Lindenhurst Village Square on Wellwood Avenue. Babylon Citizens Council on the Arts teamed up with BeautifyEarth.org in 2014 to help launch the mural project, aimed to help beautify the neighborhood.

Greenport

You can find this rusty relic stationed outside
Photo Credit: Amy Onorato

You can find this rusty relic stationed outside of the Railroad Museum of Long Island in Greenport Village. According to the museum's website, this piece is a retired LIRR snow plow and is nicknamed "Jaws III."

Massapequa

Johnny McGorey's is an Irish pub across the

Johnny McGorey's is an Irish pub across the street from the LIRR station in Massapequa Park. If you walk into the parking lot behind the bar, you'll come across a mural of some patrons, celebrating over what seems to be Guinness and glasses of whiskey -- a fitting choice.

Manorville

Photo Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara

"Stargazer" is a 70-by-50-foot sculpture by Linda Scott which sits on farmland along the east side of Route 111 in Manorville. Built in 1991, it is considered by some to be the unofficial gateway to the Hamptons.

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