TODAY'S PAPER
42° Good Evening
42° Good Evening
Long Island

LI students win at Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

The Island’s top-placing student was Amy Shteyman, a senior at Great Neck North High School.

Great Neck North High School senior Amy Shteyman

Great Neck North High School senior Amy Shteyman was one of 24 best-of-category winners at this year's Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Credit: Great Neck School District

Eighteen Long Island students won awards in May at this year’s Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh.

The fair, a program of the Society for Science & the Public, consisted of about 1,800 high school students selected from 420 affiliate fairs in 81 countries competing for some $4 million in prizes.

Long Island’s top-placing student was Amy Shteyman, a senior at John L. Miller Great Neck North High School, who won Best of Category in Behavioral and Social Sciences. She and 23 other best-of-category winners received $5,000 in addition to their $3,000 first-place award, as well as $1,000 grants to both their school and their affiliated fair.

Other local award winners were: Smiti Shah, Bethpage; Raphael Iskra and Pragati Muthukumar, Commack High School; Kimberly Lu, Cindy Wang and Michelle Xing, Great Neck South High School; Arooba Ahmed and Jiachen Lee, Half Hollow Hills High School East; Jillian Parker, Half Hollow Hills High School West; Eish Maheshwari, Herricks High School in New Hyde Park; Chiu Fan Bowen Lo, Shruthi Shekar and Kendra Zhang, Jericho High School; Emily Cruz and Susan Wu, Manhasset High School; Matthew Mullahy, Smithtown High School East; and Sarah Adamo, Smithtown High School West.

“The breakthrough ideas presented by the winners and finalists demonstrate how the brilliant minds of future generations will make the world a better place,” said Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science & the Public.

JERICHO

Code Rush

Two teams from Schechter School of Long Island’s Lower School were the only New York teams to place in the top 10 of Code Rush, a nationwide coding competition coordinated by the online game-based platform CodeMonkey. The teams placed ninth and 10th in the 3rd-to-5th-grade category.

The monthlong competition, which attracted hundreds of teams throughout the United States, asked participants to solve a progressive series of 150 coding challenges through collaborative play and problem-solving in an effort to learn the programming language CoffeeScript.

The winning teams received an annual CodeMonkey classroom subscription, a subscription to the learning program Flocabulary and a Makey Makey GO invention kit.

ROSLYN

WAC Science Fair

Roslyn High School had six first-place projects in various categories — the most of any Long Island school — in this year’s WAC Lighting Foundation Invitational Science Fair coordinated by the Research Association, a nonprofit consortium of lead research teachers from 12 local participating schools.

Roslyn’s first-place students were Nicole Blattman, Asher Bykov, Joshua Flashner, Andrew Goldberg, Johanna Kann, Makenzie Komack, Feyi Rufai, Olivia Viruet-Quintero and Jeffrey Yu.

Nassau County’s other first-place winners and their high schools were: Qingyuan Qian, Great Neck North; Timothy Qi, Great Neck South; Emma Gan, Arianna Pahlavan, Amber Patrick and Shruthi Shekar, Jericho High School; Kevin Gauld, Baokun Gu, Aden Horowitz and Joseph Yoo, Manhasset; and Benjamin Goldstein, Emma Klein, Edward Samowitz and Dhiya Sani, Paul D. Schreiber High School.

SYOSSET

Forensic champs

A Syosset High School team is this year’s overall state champion of the New York State Forensic League’s New York State Grand Championship Tournament at Hofstra University.

The tournament, which attracted more than 1,000 students from 75 schools statewide, featured the following divisions: speech, policy debate, public form debate, Lincoln Douglas debate, and Student Congress. Syosset had more than 30 competitors advance past preliminary rounds and won numerous team awards, including first place in the Student Congress.

In addition, Syosset students Iree Mann and Saba Mehrzad were the dramatic interpretation speech and novice Lincoln Douglas debate champions, respectively. Other Nassau County winners were a Roslyn High School team in Lincoln Douglas debate and Chaminade High School senior John Magliore in varsity Lincoln Douglas debate.— Michael R. Ebert

Eighteen Long Island students won awards in May at this year’s Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh.

The fair, a program of the Society for Science & the Public, consisted of about 1,800 high school students selected from 420 affiliate fairs in 81 countries competing for some $4 million in prizes.

Long Island’s top-placing student was Amy Shteyman, a senior at John L. Miller Great Neck North High School, who won the Best of Category in Behavioral and Social Sciences. She and 23 other best-of-category winners received $5,000 in addition to their $3,000 first-place award, as well as $1,000 grants to both their school and their affiliated fair.

Other local award winners were: Smiti Shah, Bethpage; Raphael Iskra and Pragati Muthukumar, Commack High School; Kimberly Lu, Cindy Wang and Michelle Xing, Great Neck South High School; Arooba Ahmed and Jiachen Lee, Half Hollow Hills High School East; Jillian Parker, Half Hollow Hills High School West; Eish Maheshwari, Herricks High School; Chiu Fan Bowen Lo, Shruthi Shekar and Kendra Zhang, Jericho High School; Emily Cruz and Susan Wu, Manhasset High School; Matthew Mullahy, Smithtown High School East; and Sarah Adamo, Smithtown High School West.

“The breakthrough ideas presented by the winners and finalists demonstrate how the brilliant minds of future generations will make the world a better place,” said Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science & the Public.

COMMACK

WAC Science Fair

Commack High School students Gabriel Chan and Anoop Singh were the only Suffolk County participants with first-place projects in any category of this year’s WAC Lighting Foundation Invitational Science Fair coordinated by the Research Association, a nonprofit consortium of lead research teachers from 12 local participating schools.

Chan won the physics and astronomy category for his project titled “An Identification of Forces Affecting Coronal Mass Ejection Development,” while Singh won the Earth and environmental sciences category for his project, “A Multilinear Approach to Forecasting the El Niño Southern Oscillation.”

Roslyn High School students had six first-place projects, the most of any Long Island school.

ISLIP

Virtual Enterprises

Islip High School’s Fresh Direct team placed eighth nationwide — the highest placement of any Long Island team — in Virtual Enterprises International’s 2018 National Business Plan Competition, which challenged students to demonstrate their global business expertise through written business plans and oral presentations. It was held in April during the organization’s Youth Business Summit in Manhattan.

Fresh Direct’s business plan consisted of a “gourmet food delivery service using a store-to-door mentality to deliver quality ingredients and decorations across the U.S.,” the organization said.

To reach the national level, the team was first among 90 simulated businesses competing at the local level in January, with 12 teams advancing to the final round at American Portfolio Financial Services in Holbrook. From there, five teams were among 28 nationwide to reach the national level.

RONKONKOMA

Sumdog winners

James Longo’s fifth-grade class at Helen B. Duffield Elementary School outscored more than 1,200 classes nationwide to be named first-place winners in Sumdog’s National Math Contest. In addition, Duffield fifth-graders Jaime Canas and Andrew Kwanza received scores that placed them in the top 10 among more than 25,000 participants.

Sumdog is an adaptive educational learning service that uses online games to help students practice numeracy and literacy skills. Games are individualized for each child’s ability level, so users can play against opponents with the same skills.

Longo’s class has previously placed first in Sumdog’s regional math contests, but this was their first time entering a national contest, school officials said. — Michael R. Ebert

Eighteen Long Island students won awards in May at this year’s Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh.

The fair, a program of the Society for Science & the Public, consisted of about 1,800 high school students selected from 420 affiliate fairs in 81 countries competing for some $4 million in prizes.

Long Island’s top-placing student was Amy Shteyman, a senior at John L. Miller Great Neck North High School, who won the Best of Category in Behavioral and Social Sciences. She and 23 other best-of-category winners received $5,000 in addition to their $3,000 first-place award, as well as $1,000 grants to both their school and their affiliated fair.

Other local award winners were: Smiti Shah, Bethpage; Raphael Iskra and Pragati Muthukumar, Commack High School; Kimberly Lu, Cindy Wang and Michelle Xing, Great Neck South High School; Arooba Ahmed and Jiachen Lee, Half Hollow Hills High School East; Jillian Parker, Half Hollow Hills High School West; Eish Maheshwari, Herricks High School in New Hyde Park; Chiu Fan Bowen Lo, Shruthi Shekar and Kendra Zhang, Jericho High School; Emily Cruz and Susan Wu, Manhasset High School; Matthew Mullahy, Smithtown High School East; and Sarah Adamo, Smithtown High School West.

“The breakthrough ideas presented by the winners and finalists demonstrate how the brilliant minds of future generations will make the world a better place,” said Maya Ajmera, president and CEO of the Society for Science & the Public.

COMMACK

WAC Science Fair

Commack High School students Gabriel Chan and Anoop Singh were the only Suffolk County participants with first-place projects in any category of this year’s WAC Lighting Foundation Invitational Science Fair coordinated by the Research Association, a nonprofit consortium of lead research teachers from 12 local participating schools.

Chan won the physics and astronomy category for his project titled “An Identification of Forces Affecting Coronal Mass Ejection Development,” while Singh won the Earth and environmental sciences category for his project, “A Multilinear Approach to Forecasting the El Niño Southern Oscillation.”

Roslyn High School students had six first-place projects, the most of any Long Island school.

ISLIP

Virtual Enterprises

Islip High School’s Fresh Direct team placed eighth nationwide — the highest placement of any Long Island team — in Virtual Enterprises International’s 2018 National Business Plan Competition, which challenged students to demonstrate their global business expertise through written business plans and oral presentations. It was held in April during the organization’s Youth Business Summit in Manhattan.

Fresh Direct’s business plan consisted of a “gourmet food delivery service using a store-to-door mentality to deliver quality ingredients and decorations across the U.S.,” the organization said.

To reach the national level, the team was first among 90 simulated businesses competing at the local level in January, with 12 teams advancing to the final round at American Portfolio Financial Services in Holbrook. From there, five teams were among 28 nationwide to reach the national level.

RONKONKOMA

Sumdog winners

James Longo’s fifth-grade class at Helen B. Duffield Elementary School outscored more than 1,200 classes nationwide to be named first-place winners in Sumdog’s National Math Contest. In addition, Duffield fifth-graders Jaime Canas and Andrew Kwanza received scores that placed them in the top 10 among more than 25,000 participants.

Sumdog is an adaptive educational learning service that uses online games to help students practice numeracy and literacy skills. Games are individualized for each child’s ability level, so users can play against opponents with the same skills.

Longo’s class has previously placed first in Sumdog’s regional math contests, but this was their first time entering a national contest, school officials said. — Michael R. Ebert

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

Latest Long Island News