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Long IslandNassau

LIRR: Man reports falling into Penn Station platform gap

A Nassau County police ambulance transported the customer from the train when it arrived in Seaford, officials said.

A man was taken by ambulance from the

A man was taken by ambulance from the Long Island Rail Road's Seaford station Thursday, Dec. 28, 2017, after saying he fell into the gap between the train and the platform at Penn Station, officials said. Photo Credit: John Scalesi

A man was taken by ambulance from the Long Island Rail Road’s Seaford station Thursday night after saying he fell into the gap between the train and the platform before boarding at Penn Station, officials said.

Information about injuries the man might have suffered was not immediately available, nor was the man’s name or age.

A customer told train crew members at Penn Station that he had fallen into a gap at Penn Station as the train was receiving passengers, LIRR spokeswoman Sarah Armaghan said. Armaghan added the man had gotten out of the gap on his own.

Armaghan said the circumstances surrounding the man’s fall are being investigated.

The man reported the incident himself so authorities had not yet determined what had happened, Armaghan said. She noted that he sought medical attention.

According to a Nassau County police spokesman, one of the department’s ambulances was called to the Seaford station at 10:15 p.m. but additional details were not available.

The possible danger presented by the gaps on the LIRR system first gained attention after the 2006 death of a visiting Minnesota teenager, Natalie Smead, who fell into a gap at the Woodside, Queens, station and was struck by a train.

Smead’s death led to a Newsday investigation that found there had been more than 800 gap accidents from 1995 to early 2007. After that investigation, the LIRR spent $27 million to shrink the gaps between trains and platforms, including at Syosset, where the gap was among the widest in the LIRR system. After, the incidence of falls began to decrease.

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