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Long IslandNassau

Long Beach launches search for new city manager, comptroller

The new hire will replace Jack Schnirman, who was elected Nassau County comptroller in November. The salary for the position has not been disclosed.

A search is on to replace Jack Schnirman,

A search is on to replace Jack Schnirman, seen here on Nov. 13, 2017. The Long Beach city manager was elected as Nassau County comptroller. Photo Credit: Howard Schnapp

Wanted: A new city manager for Long Beach.

Long Beach officials have posted a job opening to hire someone to replace outgoing City Manager Jack Schnirman, who leaves Jan. 1 after being elected Nassau County comptroller.

“The City Manager is the CEO of the City, appointed by and working under the direction of the five-member City Council,” the job posting reads. “The City Manager will implement and oversee policies crafted by the City Council, as well as manage this full-service City with 363 full-time employees and a Fiscal Year 2017/18 total budget of $110 million.”

The four Democratic incumbent City Council members and incoming City Councilman John Bendo posted the job listing last week on employment websites such as indeed.com to kick off a nationwide search for the city’s top executive.

“Hopefully, we’re going to get the best candidate for the job,” Long Beach City Council Vice President Anthony Eramo said. “The job comes with a very high salary, although the job comes with a lot of responsibilities.”

Eramo said the council has not discussed the city manager salary, but he said it will reflect the new hire’s experience.

Schnirman was hired as city manager in 2012 and served five years with the city. He previously served two years as Brookhaven’s deputy town supervisor.

Schnirman was paid $174,000, making him the highest paid top official in Long Island towns and cities, but ranked behind several village mayors.

Long Beach rebuilt from superstorm Sandy flooding damage and marked a $24.2 million budget turnaround during Schnirman’s tenure. He came into office inheriting a $14.7 million budget deficit.

City officials said they may not have a new manager contract in place by the beginning of the year and may have to appoint an interim city manager, likely from among current city employees.

A new city manager must live in the city within 90 days after getting hired.

Long Beach officials are seeking a candidate with five years experience and financial expertise to manage economic development, maintain an annual budget and work with local, state and federal government agencies.

The city also posted a listing to hire a new city comptroller with the departure of acting Comptroller Shari James. City officials said they are reviewing applicants and plan interviews with City Council members and department commissioners.

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