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Long IslandNassau

Jurors in corruption trial ask to see footage of Mangano’s front door

Assistant U.S. Attorney Catherine Mirabile said she believes the request relates to obstruction of justice charges in the case.

Linda and Edward Mangano arrive at federal court

Linda and Edward Mangano arrive at federal court in Central Islip on Wednesday. Photo Credit: James Carbone

This story was reported by Nicole Fuller, Robert E. Kessler, Chau Lam, Bridget Murphy, Emily Ngo and Andrew Smith. It was written by Ngo.

Jurors considering the federal corruption charges against former Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and former Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto asked Wednesday to review security camera footage of the Mangano family’s front door.

They also requested a transcript of restaurateur Harendra Singh’s testimony about the video clips, which were played earlier in the trial and show various visits in 2015 by Singh, his then-attorney Joseph Conway and FBI agents to the Manganos’ Bethpage home.

The jury of seven women and five men did not reach a verdict Wednesday and is set to return Thursday to Central Islip for its fifth day of deliberations.

The trial is now in its 11th week.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Catherine Mirabile said she believes jurors’ request relates to obstruction of justice charges.

Mangano and his wife, Linda, each face a charge of conspiracy to obstruct justice.

Linda Mangano additionally faces one count of obstruction of justice and three counts of making false statements to the FBI — all in relation to what prosecutors say was a no-show job Singh gave her as a means of bribing her husband.

Jurors are deciding whether prosecutors proved their allegations that Edward Mangano helped Singh secure two county contracts and whether Mangano and Venditto did the same with more than $20 million in town-guaranteed loans, all in exchange for an illegal stream of benefits.

The panel gathered in the courtroom Wednesday to re-watch 18 video clips — silent footage from the Nassau County police camera trained on the Manganos’ front door as a security measure during Edward Mangano’s tenure as county executive.

The clips portray, among other visits, Singh coming and going, Singh and his then-lawyer coming and going and the FBI agents coming and going.

Jurors are expected to receive the transcript of Singh’s corresponding testimony on Thursday morning.

An FBI special agent earlier in the trial testified that she and her partner interviewed Linda Mangano at her home about the Singh job, which prosecutors say paid her $450,000 between April 2010 and August 2014. The agent, Laura Spence, testified that Linda Mangano told her several lies.

Edward Mangano, 56, of Bethpage, and Venditto, 68, of North Massapequa, have pleaded not guilty to several corruption-related charges that include federal program bribery and honest-services wire fraud, extortion for Mangano and securities fraud for Venditto.

Linda Mangano, 54, of Bethpage, also has pleaded not guilty to her charges.

Her attorney, John Carman of Garden City, told reporters he’s not sure why jurors asked to see the surveillance video of the Manganos’ home.

“Nothing in those tapes is disputed. The time of the visits, the duration of visits, who visited,” Carman said. “None of that was in dispute.”

Edward Mangano’s defense attorney, Marc Agnifilo of Manhattan, said of the jurors: “They’re in the weeds. It’s obvious that they have certain things they’re talking about. We only had one note today and they’re back there working.”

Jurors had sent notes Monday and Tuesday to U.S. District Judge Joan M. Azrack saying on both days that they could not come to an agreement “on certain items.”

But Azrack encouraged them to keep working toward a verdict and reminded them of the oath they had taken.

The jury’s only note Wednesday was its request for information relating to the visits to the Mangano home.

Azrack dismissed jurors at about 4:10 p.m., about an hour earlier than usual, because one member had a personal matter to attend to.

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