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Plainview man charged in cop death sentenced in DWI case

A file photo of Jose Borbon leaving Nassau

A file photo of Jose Borbon leaving Nassau County Court in Mineola. (July 28, 2010) Credit: Kevin P. Coughlin

A Plainview man accused of driving drunk and crashing into a Suffolk police officer, killing him, was sentenced to a year in prison on unrelated drunken driving and weapons charges Wednesday.

Jose Borbon, 24, pleaded guilty to being drunk and carrying a gravity knife when he was stopped on the Long Island Expressway in Plainview on Jan. 4, 2009. He registered a 0.15 percent blood alcohol content on a breath test, said prosecutor Matthew Lampert. The legal limit is .08 percent.

He was released on bail and issued a conditional drivers' license. Six weeks later, Suffolk prosecutors say, Borbon was drunk and talking on his cell phone on Feb. 22, 2009, when he crashed into officer Glen Ciano's patrol car at Commack Road and Vanderbilt Parkway in Commack. Ciano died after his police car struck a utility pole and burst into flames.

Borbon was sentenced Wednesday for misdemeanor drunken driving and felony possession of a weapon in Nassau County Supreme Court in Mineola. Lampert asked for the maximum sentence of 2 1/3 years to 7 years in prison on the felony weapons charge, arguing that Borbon's behavior after he posted bail had "horrific consequences, which should have never happened."

Defense attorney Jessica Tirino said that the Suffolk case was pending and unrelated to the Nassau sentencing.

Supreme Court Justice William Donnino acknowledged the serious charges pending against Borbon and told the dozens of Ciano supporters in the courtroom that "I am deeply sorry for the loss of Suffolk County Police Officer Glen Ciano." But, Donnino said, his jurisdiction was limited to the Nassau case. He imposed the maximum sentence for the misdemeanor DWI charge.

In the Suffolk case, Borbon had a blood-alcohol level of .19 percent, more than twice the legal limit of .08 percent, authorities said. He has pleaded not guilty to second-degree manslaughter and first-degree vehicular manslaughter and is due back in court Sept. 20.

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