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$2.5M settlement in Hempstead Town sand truck crash

The town board approved a bond to pay the driver seriously injured in a 2013 crash in Oceanside involving a town sand truck. 

A Hempstead Town sand truck collided with a

A Hempstead Town sand truck collided with a box truck on Long Beach Road and West Windsor Parkway on Feb. 3, 2013. Photo Credit: Lou Minutoli

Hempstead Town Board members passed a $2.5 million bond to cover a settlement to a driver who was injured during a 2013 crash with a town sand truck in Oceanside.

The board unanimously voted on Nov. 13 to approve the settlement to be paid to Danny J. Miller and Josephine Miller for the Feb. 3, 2013, crash.

Danny Miller’s box work truck was struck by a Hempstead Town highway truck on Long Beach Road at West Windsor Parkway after the town driver ran through a red light, Miller’s Garden City-based attorney Joseph Dell said.

Miller was heading to a job in Oceanside when the highway truck made an illegal U-turn and struck Miller’s truck at a four-way intersection, Dell said. It was not snowing at the time, and the truck was sanding the road.

Miller was seriously injured in the crash, needed to use a wheelchair and was unable to speak, Town Attorney Joe Ra said during the meeting. His wife, Josephine Miller, was not in the truck at the time of the collision. Hempstead officials did not identify the town employee and could not be reached for further comment.

Miller suffered several orthopedic injuries and later had a stroke due to blood clots, limiting his ability to speak and causing neurological impairments, Dell said.

In a news brief about the accident, Newsday reported that the Oceanside Fire Department used rescue equipment to free the box truck driver. The sand truck driver was evaluated but was not taken to a hospital, the article said.  

A jury in a Nassau Supreme Court civil trial found on Sept. 28 that the town was 100 percent liable for the crash and Miller’s injuries, Dell said. The town then offered to settle damages for pain and suffering at $2.5 million.

“It exposed them to a verdict that if the jury believed the stroke was related to the accident, Mr. Miller could have been awarded in excess of $3-$4 million,” Dell said.

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