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Clinton was ‘extremely careless’; how damaged is she now?

President Barack Obama, with Hillary Clinton during a

President Barack Obama, with Hillary Clinton during a campaign event in Charlotte, N.C., on Tuesday, July 5, 2016, did not address statements made by FBI chief James Comey on the candidate's use of private email servers. Photo Credit: AP / Susan Walsh

Clinton’s oversized baggage

Hillary Clinton was “extremely careless.”

Contrary to what she has said, classified emails passed through her private servers.

And though not certain, “it is possible that hostile actors” penetrated Clinton’s email account as secretary of state.

Yes, no criminal charges were recommended because FBI Director James Comey said investigators didn’t find an intent to expose classified information. (See video of Comey here and read his statement here.)

A brief statement from Clinton’s campaign said the use of personal email was “a mistake” and “this matter is now resolved.”

But her electoral pitch versus Donald Trump’s on judgment and competence is looking vulnerable, and the viral voter mistrust she has acknowledged facing will be harder to overcome.

The Washington Post detailed how the new revelations from Comey Tuesday contradict her longtime spin on the scandal — a big reason it is not going to fade away anytime soon.

Trump: A ‘rigged’ result

A “rigged system” is the reason Clinton won’t face “the criminal charges that she deserves,” Trump said, in a series of tweets, and via a statement, a Fox News interview and a speech to a rally in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Trump suggested there were elements of a conspiracy — that it was “no accident” that Bill Clinton had his much-criticized airport encounter with Attorney General Loretta Lynch or that Comey’s announcement came on the day President Barack Obama campaigned with Clinton for the first time.

He suggested an effort to bribe Lynch with an offer that she could keep her job in a Clinton administration.

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) promised new hearings into the matter, saying, "People have been convicted for far less."

The take-away: Clinton’s e-fail

“Inept but not corrupt!” doesn’t usually make for a strong campaign slogan, and the extraordinary sight of the top federal law agent saying that a U.S. secretary of state was “extremely careless” with sensitive information is a big net minus for Clinton, writes Newsday’s Dan Janison.

‘Faith’ and ‘judgment’

Neither Clinton nor Obama had anything to say about the FBI findings as he led a rousing rally for her in North Carolina hours after the Comey announcement.

It was up to the viewers at the Charlotte Convention Center and watching cable news to decide whether an irony lens should be applied to such Obama testimonials as “I have had a front-row seat to her judgment” and “My faith in Hillary Clinton has always been rewarded.”

Newsday’s Laura Figueroa, who covered the speech, found audience members concerned about the email case. One concluded of Clinton: “The good outweighs the bad.”

Ryan blasts star tweet

Ryan ripped Trump and his campaign for the "Star of David" tweet that created an uproar over the holiday weekend and said, “I really believe he’s gotta clean up the way his new media works.”

In an interview with a conservative Milwaukee radio host, Ryan said “anti-Semitic images have no place in a presidential campaign.”

Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke isn’t buying the explanation that the star depicted a sheriff’s badge. It was a “big Star of David,” Duke said. He approved.

Employee calls out son-in-law

An entertainment writer at The Observer — the New York weekly owned by Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and a top campaign adviser — wrote an online open letter assailing Trump and her boss in the wake of the "Star of David" tweet.

“How do you allow this? Because, Mr. Kushner, you are allowing this,” wrote Dana Schwartz. “When you stand silent and smiling in the background, his Jewish son-in-law, you’re giving his most hateful supporters tacit approval,” she said.

Editor Ken Kurson told Politico he signed off on posting the letter, but “I disagree with Dana’s criticism.” He said he had not discussed the piece with Kushner.

What else is happening

  • Sometime-Trump adviser Ben Carson tweeted, naming no one in particular: “Social media provides a great platform for discourse, but we must be careful with the messages we send out.”
  • Eclipsed a bit in the e-mail uproar was Trump's renewed praise for Saddam Hussein as efficiently killing "terrorists." Ryan insisted the late Iraqi dicatator was "one of the 20th century's most evil people."
  • Trump’s social media chief, Daniel Scavino, was formerly general manager of the mogul’s Hudson Valley golf club and met him when he was a teenage caddie.
  • Clinton is due in Atlantic City to spotlight Trump's "wake of destruction" in the form of bankrupt casinos, as the Wall Street Journal describes it.
  • Bernie Sanders is no longer actively campaigning, but still has Secret Service protection. The cost could reach $2 million before the Democratic convention is over, CNN reported.
  • Clinton was booed amid an otherwise positive reception at a National Education Association meeting in Washington when she said traditional public schools and charter schools should share ideas.
  • During the Republican convention, Clinton will speak to the AFSCME union in Las Vegas and an NAACP event in Ohio.
  • Trump, who is reported likely to announce his running mate next week, had Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker join him in Raleigh Tuesday. Newt Gingrich will be at Trump’s event in Cincinnati Wednesday.
  • Snoop Dogg is set to headline a “unity party” organized by Democratic super PACs after the windup of the convention in Philadelphia.
  • Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, a critic of U.S. trade deals, has become a key Clinton defender and could offset Trump if picked as her running-mate, according to Politico...
  • Trump has the wrong skill set for the presidency given his "selfish" and "reckless" business practices, argues NYU urban expert Mitchell Moss....

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