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Laura Curran orders review of Nassau departments

The new Nassau County executive has given her top deputies 60 days to analyze issues including recent budget cuts to county departments.

Nassau County Executive Laura Curran in her office

Nassau County Executive Laura Curran in her office after being sworn in on Monday, Jan. 1, 2018 in Mineola. Photo Credit: Howard Schnapp

Nassau County Executive Laura Curran has directed her top deputies ordering them to analyze departmental staffing, equipment, performance levels and the effect of recent budget cuts.

Curran, a Democrat who took office Jan. 1, gave her deputy county executives 60 days to issue a report of the status of departments they oversee.

“We’re sorting out this mess and it’s going to be a painful process,” Curran said in a statement. “An in-depth critical analysis of each department is essential to evaluate the options in front of us.”

The review will focus, in part, on the impact of across-the-board budget cuts imposed by Nassau’s fiscal control board.

The Nassau Interim Finance Authority last month approved the county’s 2018 budget after ordering $18 million in spending cuts to all departments.

NIFA, a state monitoring board in control of the county’s finances, gave Curran until March 15 to offer any significant changes to the budget, which was negotiated while Republican County Executive Edward Mangano was in office.

NIFA Chairman Adam Barsky said he “appreciates the immediate attention that County Executive Curran and her team have given to this issue.”

Legislative Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (D-Freeport) called the memo a “standard transition practice when a new administration inherits a fiscal mess.”

“This was fully expected and we look forward to seeing the County Executive’s plan of implementation,” said Presiding Officer Richard Nicolello (R-New Hyde Park).

Curran said the department-level review was “urgent.”

“In the end I believe Nassau County’s finances can be stable and NIFA’s control period could finally be over,” Curran said. “But that is going to take some hard work and we have already begun.”

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