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Earth-drilling science vessel studied at New Rochelle Public Library

Carolyn Webber explains to Isabella Sapag, 8, from

Carolyn Webber explains to Isabella Sapag, 8, from New Rochelle, what she's seeing through the microscope while Leonal Sapag, 6, waits for his turn. Children and parents learned about "Uncovering the Earth's Secrets" during Saturday's BID Science Day at the New Rochelle Public Library. (April 6, 2013) Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Children and parents learned about the Joint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling Resolution, or JOIDES, America's only research vessel dedicated to scientific ocean drilling, during "Uncovering the Earth's Secrets" during Saturday's BID Science Day at the New Rochelle Public Library. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, an international marine research program, uses the scientific drilling ship in its research. (April 6, 2013)

Carolyn Webber explains to Isabella Sapag, 8, from
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Carolyn Webber explains to Isabella Sapag, 8, from New Rochelle, what she's seeing through the microscope while Leonal Sapag, 6, waits for his turn. Children and parents learned about "Uncovering the Earth's Secrets" during Saturday's BID Science Day at the New Rochelle Public Library. (April 6, 2013)

Author Kevin Kurtz of the children's book
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Author Kevin Kurtz of the children's book "Uncovering Earths Secrets" holds a picture of the JOIDES Resolution, whose crew members children spoke via Skype during Saturday's BID Science Day at the New Rochelle Public Library. (April 6, 2013)

An exhibit at the New Rochelle Library introduced
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

An exhibit at the New Rochelle Library introduced child and adults to an American ship called the JOIDES Resolution. The ship's crew includes scientists who drill into the earth below the ocean to uncover samples of the earth's core. (April 6, 2013)

Debbie Rosario, left, explains samples from the earth's
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Debbie Rosario, left, explains samples from the earth's core to Rhea Elliott, 6, of New Rochelle. (April 6, 2013)

A map of an area where the JOIDES
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

A map of an area where the JOIDES Resolution conducted deep-sea drilling is photographed. (April 6, 2013)

Girl Scouts Jasmine Greenfield and Clara Kaufman, both
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Girl Scouts Jasmine Greenfield and Clara Kaufman, both 11 and of New Rochelle, watch and record as they talk via Skype with crew members of the ship JOIDES Resolution that sits off the coast of British Columbia. (April 6, 2013)

Children talk via Skype with a scientist aboard
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

Children talk via Skype with a scientist aboard the drilling ship JOIDES Resolution. (April 6, 2013)

An exhibit at the New Rochelle Public Library
Photo Credit: Lisa Weir

An exhibit at the New Rochelle Public Library introduced children and adults to an American ship called the JOIDES Resolution. The ship's crew includes scientists who drill into the earth below the ocean to uncover samples of the earth's core. The red line in the core sample behind the toy dinosaur marks the layer when dinosaurs became extinct. (April 6, 2013)

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