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Fred Ippolitio, Frank Antetomaso once were part of Oyster Bay’s CIA

Former Town of Oyster Bay planning commissioner, Fred

Former Town of Oyster Bay planning commissioner, Fred Ippolito, in wheelchair, leaves federal court in Central Islip on Tuesday with his lawyer Brian J. Griffin, right, and Frank Antetomaso on Jan. 26, 2016. Photo Credit: James Carbone

Political ties run long and deep in the Nassau Republican Party.

After Fred Ippolito, Oyster Bay Town’s commissioner of planning and development, pleaded guilty to federal tax evasion Tuesday, the frail 77-year-old Syossett Republican was pushed out of the federal courthouse in his wheelchair by former town Public Works Commissioner Frank Antetomaso.

For 10 years from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s, Ippolito and Antetomaso were part of a trio known as the “CIA” that controlled the Republican town’s government and patronage. The intials stood for the last names of then-Supervisor Joseph Colby, Ippolito and Antetomaso.

After Republican leaders complained that the three men made too many decisions without consulting them, Colby was elected in 1987 to State Supreme Court. Ippolito, who ran afoul of Nassau GOP Chairman Joseph Mondello, was asked to resign in 1988 by Colby’s successor, Angello Delligatti. Antetomoso remained public works commissioner until early 1989 when he left to become a partner in Sidney B. Bowne & Son, a major engineering consultant firm that works for the town and county.

After Ippolito made up with Mondello, Town Supervisor John Venditto brought Ippolito back as planning and development commissioner in January 2009. Colby died last year.

Though still at Bowne, Antetomaso has remained influential in the town. His son, John, served as supervisor of conservation and waterways until he was reassigned in 2013 after he admitted to storing three of his family’s boats in a town building.

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