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Edward Mangano's eldest son is a new Nassau police recruit

The eldest son of former Nassau County Executive

The eldest son of former Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, seen on May 29, 2018, is a new Nassau County police recruit: Salvatore Mangano. Photo Credit: James Carbone

Salvatore Mangano, eldest son of former Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, is one of the newest Nassau County police recruits.

The 27-year-old, known as “Sal,” was one of 29 recruits appointed a police officer last month for a probationary period of 18 months, according to the county comptroller’s office. Sal Mangano is assigned to the police academy where he’ll undergo several months of training with his fellow recruits before hitting the streets as a patrol cop. He will earn an annual salary of $35,000, the office said.

Nassau police spokesman Det. Lt. Richard LeBrun confirmed Sal Mangano's presence in the latest recruit class, saying he took the police exam on Dec. 9, 2012 and "underwent all testing, as all other recruits, to be hired."

The Manganos' other son Alex Mangano is an assistant district attorney in the Bronx, according to his LinkedIn profile.

In a statement through Edward Mangano’s attorney Kevin Keating, the Manganos said: “We are extremely proud of our sons who have worked very hard and become fine men. Our oldest son has indeed entered the police academy and our youngest serves as an assistant district attorney.”

The former county executive, who was elected in 2009 and served two terms, and his wife Linda Mangano, were convicted earlier this year — after their first trial ended with a hung jury — on federal corruption charges. They're scheduled to be sentenced in October. Lawyers for the couple have said they will appeal.

Nassau Police Commissioner Patrick Ryder said he assigned a supervisor to oversee Sal Mangano’s background investigation, part of the police recruit process, to ensure he was treated like all other applicants.

“He probably got more scrutinized than anyone else because of his background,” said Ryder. “I’m happy for the kid. I’m proud to put him in the family.”

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