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Long IslandPolitics

How many women represent Long Island?

Women are underrepresented in Long Island government and the rest of the country.

Democratic Nassau County Executive-elect Laura Curran and Hempstead

Democratic Nassau County Executive-elect Laura Curran and Hempstead Town Supervisor-elect Laura Gillen celebrate their victories at the Inn at New Hyde Park Tuesday on Nov. 7, 2017. Photo Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.

About 51 percent of Long Islanders are women, according to the most recent estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Newsday looked at the gender breakdown of elected officials in statewide positions or who represent Long Island in the U.S. Congress or State Legislature, county-level officials, and town and city leaders and council members. Woman make up about 35 percent of those positions.

Gender representation among Long Island elected officials

Men Women

This year’s midterm election has set records for woman nominees competing for U.S. House, U.S. Senate and governor seats. Donors, activists and candidates are working together for gender parity in government, but no federal or state legislative body currently has as many women as men, according to advocacy group RepresentWomen.

In its 2018 Gender Parity Index report, RepresentWomen found that, nationwide, women make up 25.3 percent of state legislators, up from less than 20 percent in 1992. New York ranks 14 on the index, trailing states like New Hampshire, Washington and Idaho that top the ranking.

Long Island’s county legislatures are more representative than the state legislature, which is about 28 percent women. New York’s town and city councils have an even higher ratio of women to men, with women making up about 42 percent of council members.

Breakdown of Long Island gender representation

Men Women

CORRECTION: Nassau County Legislators Denise Ford and Debra Mule and Nassau County Comptroller Jack Schnirman were listed under the wrong party in an earlier version of this article.

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