TODAY'S PAPER
32° Good Morning
CLOSINGS
32° Good Morning
Long Island

Study: Young, single and living with parents

The New York metropolitan region, including Long Island,

The New York metropolitan region, including Long Island, has among the nation's highest percentages of young adults living with their parents, according to a study released Wednesday. Credit: iStock

The New York metropolitan region, including Long Island, has among the nation's highest percentages of young adults living with their parents, according to a study released Wednesday.

Thirty percent of young adults aged 25 to 29 in the area lived with their parents in 2007-09, ranking it fifth among 100 metro regions analyzed by Ohio State University sociologist Zhenchao Qian. The age group was selected because of the expectation that those young adults would have completed college and be living independently.

The 10 regions with the highest percentages of young people living with parents have several things in common, the study said, including:

High unemployment rates, ranging from 5.2 percent to 8.3 percent.

More young adults with a high school education or less, and fewer with a college education.

Low marriage rates.

Low median income.

Overall, the study found that young adults now are more likely to live with their parents than their counterparts in the 1980s and '90s -- likely a consequence of the recent recession and delaying marriage.

"The percentage of young adults living with parents increased in the past three decades and reached a peak in 2007-09, regardless of gender, race/ethnicity, and educational level," Qian wrote.

The study, which analyzed Census Bureau data, found that among those aged 20 to 34, 24 percent lived with their parents in 2007-09 -- the years when the recession took hold -- up from 17 percent in 1980.

The report is part of the U.S. 2010 Project, a series of studies analyzing American life, sponsored by Brown University and the Russell Sage Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Manhattan that focuses on societal and economic changes and trends.

Young adults' delaying of marriage in recent years has "increased the likelihood" of them living with their parents, the study said. In 2007-09, 38 percent of men and 47 percent of women aged 25 to 29 were married, down sharply from 59 percent of men and 65 percent of women in that age range who were married in 1980.

In addition, "economic dislocation" was a significant factor in more young people bunking with their parents. "The recession hit young adults the hardest because they were often 'last hired, first fired,' " the study said.

Norman Goodman, distinguished teaching and service professor in sociology at Stony Brook University, said the study's findings "are exactly what I would expect. You had a 'Great Recession.' People . . . are having difficulty finding jobs. They are having difficulty supporting themselves," and some are living with their parents "until the recession eases."


LIVING WITH THE FOLKS

Top 10 metropolitan areas, by percentage, of young adults aged 25 to 29 living with parents, in 2007-09:

1. Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, Conn.: 34 percent

2. Honolulu, Hawaii: 32 percent

3. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas: 31 percent

4. Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Fla.: 31 percent

5. New York-Long Island-northern New Jersey, NY-NJ-PA: 30 percent

6. Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, Calif.: 28 percent

7. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, Calif.: 28 percent

8. El Paso, Texas: 28 percent

9. Scranton & Wilkes-Barre, Pa.: 27 percent

10. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif.: 26 percent

Source: Zhenchao Qian, Ohio State University

Latest Long Island News