TODAY'S PAPER
34° Good Morning
34° Good Morning
Long IslandSuffolk

Amityville mulls code change to restrict Airbnb, other short-term rentals

Amityville's proposed restrictions would be the first time

Amityville's proposed restrictions would be the first time the village has included short-term rentals -- defined as those under 30 days -- in its code. Credit: Getty Images / Carl Court

Amityville officials will hold a public hearing Monday on a proposal to restrict short-term rentals, such as those listed with Airbnb, after receiving complaints from neighbors of a rented house.

The proposed restrictions would be the first time the village has included short-term rentals — defined as those under 30 days — in its code. Mayor Dennis Siry said the village has received numerous complaints this year about one short-term rental, such as overflowing garbage cans and cars parked on the front lawn.

“We said, 'Let’s be proactive and add this to the code before it becomes a big problem,' ” he said.

Several municipalities, including Huntington and Hempstead towns, have sought to regulate or even ban short-term rentals in recent years, as the number of Long Island homeowners listing rooms and homes on sites such as Airbnb has climbed. Newsday previously reported that according to Airbnb’s data, last year more than 4,100 Long Island hosts had about 139,000 guests, earning almost $50 million. 

Siry said the village was worried about the legality of banning short-term rentals, “but we want to make them very restrictive and they have to be watched over very closely,” he said.

Siry said the village has been made aware of three homes being used for such rentals. A Newsday review of Airbnb properties found nearly a dozen current listings, ranging from $40 a night for a bedroom in a house to $400 a night for an apartment.

Under the proposed law, those wishing to rent out their homes must first obtain a short-term rental permit. The homes have to be inspected by the village, and no advertising for the rental can be done before receiving the permit.

Those renting out must be the owner of the home and the home must remain owner-occupied during the rental, according to the proposed law. All vehicles used by renters must have parking spaces on site, the law states. In addition, no more than two bedrooms can be rented out and they cannot have cooking facilities. Bedrooms must have at least 70 square feet of floor space for one occupant and at least 50 square feet for each additional occupant.

The proposed code also mandates that short-term rentals take place for no more than 120 days in a calendar year and that the owner keep a registry with the names and dates of all rentals.

The hearing is at 7:30 p.m. at Village Hall.

Latest Long Island News