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Brightwaters joins other municipalities in tightening laws on property rentals 

The new law will take effect in 6 months, but in the meantime officials will work on establishing an application fee and fines for violators.

Brightwaters Village officials passed a law Dec. 3

Brightwaters Village officials passed a law Dec. 3 that seeks to prevent unsafe conditions at rented homes, including overcrowding, according to the legislation.  Photo Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas

Brightwaters residents are the latest Long Islanders who will need to obtain permits to rent out their houses.

The Brightwaters Village Board voted 5-0 on Dec. 3 to approve a new rental registration law.

The law seeks to prevent unsafe conditions at rented homes, including overcrowding, according to the legislation. These conditions “create blight, excessive vehicle traffic and parking problems” and “overburden municipal services,” the law said.

The legislation seeks to ensure properties comply with village code by requiring either a village inspection of the home or a written certification from a licensed architect or engineer, officials said.

Brightwaters officials are “trying to create a little order going forward,” Mayor John Valdini said.

Several Long Island municipalities have passed similar laws, including North Hempstead, Huntington, Southampton and East Hampton towns.

The Brightwaters law is expected to take effect in six months to give officials time to create an application and other paperwork, village attorney Charles J. Casolaro said. There is not yet a fee to apply for a permit or a fine for violating the law.

Officials revised the legislation after previous public hearings, including changing the renewal period from one year to three years and creating the option for an outside party to certify properties, Casolaro said.

Village building inspectors will not be able to enter properties without either permission from the owner or occupant or a search warrant, the law said.

Resident Bob Fischer called the law “overdue.” The former village trustee said he was concerned that allowing a paid architect to certify properties could make it easier for owners “to skirt more strict rules” while officials are trying “to nail down” illegal apartments.

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