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Plans in the works to rebuild Ebo Hill mansion in Smithtown

The prospective owner says he wants to return the home — which once belonged to generations of the town’s founding Smith family — to its former glory. 

An exterior view of Ebo Hill from the
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

A view of Ebo Hill from the front lawn. The estate’s grounds once extended to the Nissequogue River.

Although the first-floor windows were boarded, area teens
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Although the first-floor windows were boarded, area teens sometimes broke in and used the mansion as an illicit hangout spot, said Richard Longobardi, who is selling Ebo Hill to Richard Albano.

Exterior shot of Ebo Hill through the trees.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Ebo Hill mansion, whose 16 bedrooms, towering portico and 48 acres of woodland made it one of Smithtown’s grandest before it fell into decline decades ago, is being bought and renovated.

A view of Ebo Hill’s front porch. The
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

The  1845 home’s unusual name may derive from that of a Native American boy or chief, according to archives in the Smithtown Library’s Long Island Room. Another account in the archives suggests the name might be of an enslaved person. The pillars, added to the home in the early 19th century, are about 20 feet tall.

Brush growing on the house. Albano said the
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

The house fell into disrepair, said Brad Harris, the town historian. “For as long as I can remember it has always been boarded up, the grounds unkempt.”

An exterior view of Ebo Hill. Richard Longobardi,
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Richard Albano said he would make some changes to make the home livable but preserve as many of the home’s features as possible.

One of the mansion’s seven bathrooms. Albano said
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

One of the mansion’s seven bathrooms. Albano said he would keep the fixtures.

An interior shot showing one of the mansion’s
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

An interior shot of one of the mansion’s staircases. The home was last occupied in 2001, Richard Albano said. 

Fireplace in reception hall.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Fireplace in the reception hall.

Water-damaged plaster in one of Ebo Hill’s rooms.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Richard Albano and his workers found two-inch thick plaster on the walls so badly water-damaged it will all have to be removed.

Electric switch
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

An electric switch at the house, which is in disrepair.

An exterior shot of the house. Albano said
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Richard Albano said he would move the home about 75 feet east to make the backyard bigger.

Reception hall with staircase.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

In the grand first-floor reception room, Richard Albano pointed to discrete servant-summoning buttons and intricate wood ceiling molding. “All done by hand,” he said. “There was no machine.”

RClosets
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Closets at the mansion.

Close-up of ceiling molding from inside the mansion.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Intricate wood ceiling molding inside the mansion. Owner Richard Albano said it was hand-carved.

An antique light bulb Albano found hanging in
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

An antique light bulb Richard Albano found hanging in the basement. It didn’t work.

Close-up of latch to larder. The larder was
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Close-up of the walk-in larder once chilled by water pumped from the Nissequogue River.

Ebo Hill reception hall.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Ebo Hill reception hall.

Wall-mounted buttons that Albano believes were used to
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Wall-mounted buttons on the grand first-floor reception room. Albano believes the buttons were used to summon servants.

Needlepoint work found inside the mansion.
Photo Credit: Richard Albano

Needlepoint work found inside the mansion.

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