Long IslandTowns

Historic landmarks on Long Island

The Montauk Point Lighthouse was authorized by the

The Montauk Point Lighthouse was authorized by the second Congress under President George Washington in 1792 and completed on Nov. 5, 1796. Photo Credit: Jenny Patten

The Montauk Lighthouse becomes the 12th historic landmark on Long Island joining some other famous sites.

The WaterFront Center's oyster sloop Christeen built in
Photo Credit: Newsday/Michael E. Ach

The WaterFront Center's oyster sloop Christeen built in 1882 in Glenwood Landing sails again in Oyster Bay with a group of Jericho High School students studying environmental science. (Oct. 5, 2008)

The Montauk Point Lighthouse was authorized by the
Photo Credit: Jenny Patten

The Montauk Point Lighthouse was authorized by the second Congress under President George Washington in 1792 and completed on Nov. 5, 1796.

The John Philip Sousa house on Hicks Lane
Photo Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan

The John Philip Sousa house on Hicks Lane in Sands Point.

Larry Gay tends to the lawn of this
Photo Credit: Newsday / Thomas A Ferrara

Larry Gay tends to the lawn of this historic Old Whalers Church, also known as the First Presbyterian Church on Union Street in Sag Harbor. This church, which was dedicated in 1844, is on the National Register of Historic Places. (Sept. 29, 1996)

Built around 1649, the Old House in Cutchogue
Photo Credit: Colleen Harrington

Built around 1649, the Old House in Cutchogue is the oldest English-type house still standing in New York state. It's been restored several times and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It stands on the Village Green on Main Road in Cutchogue.

An outside view of the Pollock-Krasner House Museum
Photo Credit: Pollock-Krasner House Museum

An outside view of the Pollock-Krasner House Museum and Study Center in East Hampton where expressionist artist Jackson Pollock and his wife and fellow artist Lee Krasner lived.

Capt. Michael Caldwell and Priscilla, the oldest survivor
Photo Credit: Carl Corry

Capt. Michael Caldwell and Priscilla, the oldest survivor of a fleet of South Shore oyster dredging sloops. The Priscilla is 60 feet long with a 14-foot beam and was built in 1888. (Aug. 3, 2011)

The Modesty oyster sloop, pictured here in 1985
Photo Credit: Long Island Maritime Museum

The Modesty oyster sloop, pictured here in 1985 at the Long Island Maritime Museum in West Sayville, was built in 1923. It currently being restored at the museum. (1985)

Thomas Moran built his East Hampton house in
Photo Credit: Handout

Thomas Moran built his East Hampton house in 1884 and lived there with his wife, printmaker Mary Nimmo Moran, and their family for 40 years.

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