Editorial

Editorial: U.S. and Pakistan make up

Container trucks carrying NATO supplies are parked at

Container trucks carrying NATO supplies are parked at a terminal in Karachi, Pakistan. (July 5, 2012) (Credit: Getty Images)

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The United States and Pakistan have issues. But like spouses in a volatile marriage, the two have found a way to stay together. That's good news. The coupling is exasperating but necessary in battling terrorists.

The alliance tanked in November when 24 Pakistani soldiers were killed in a NATO airstrike. Pakistan demanded President Barack Obama apologize. He refused, and Pakistan closed routes used to truck supplies to NATO troops in Afghanistan. Seven months later both nations needed a way to end the stalemate. On Monday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said "We are sorry for the losses suffered by the Pakistani military." Pakistan reopened the supply routes and dropped other demands, and Obama released a $1.2 billion reimbursement for Pakistan's counter-insurgency operations. Being allies means sometimes having to say you're sorry.

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