TODAY'S PAPER
Good Evening
Good Evening
NewsHealth

Federal trials on Long Island, in Brooklyn halted because of coranvirus crisis

Chief Judge for the federal Eastern District

Chief Judge for the federal Eastern District  Roslynn R. Mauskopf in 2007 when she was the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District. Credit: John Marshall Mantel

All civil or criminal jury trials in federal courts on Long Island and in Brooklyn scheduled to begin before April 27 have been halted as the coronavirus crisis continues.

Roslynn Mauskopf, chief judge of the Eastern District of New York, issued the directive Monday stopping the trials "pending further order of the Court."

Jury trials that started before Monday can continue.

Citing the need to reduce the possibility of exposure to the COVID-19 virus, the declaration of a national emergency and the institution of a state ban on mass gatherings, Mauskopf also suspended the swearing in of new citizens for 45 days.

The Eastern District, which covers Long Island from Brooklyn to Montauk, has courthouses in Central Islip and Downtown Brooklyn.

Friday, the state postponed as of Monday all new civil and criminal trials in state courts. Criminal and civil trials that had already begun could continue, according to a memo from Lawrence Marks, the state’s chief administrative judge.

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Under Mauskopf's order Monday, federal judges can hold nonjury trials, hearings and conferences at their discretion, but "are strongly encouraged to conduct court proceedings by telephone or video conferencing where practicable, and/or adjourn matters or deadlines, or stay litigation where in-person meetings, interviews, depositions, or travel would be necessary."

Arraignments will continue to be conducted. Where practical, they are to be done remotely.

A memo issued last week by Mauskopf mandated that all detainees scheduled to appear in federal court, including those from the Nassau and Suffolk County detention centers, be screened to determine their body temperature. Detainees with a temperature exceeding 100.4 degrees would not be produced in court, the memo stated.

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Health