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Coronavirus on Long Island: Updates for May 14

Healthcare workers conduct COVID 19 quick tests at

Healthcare workers conduct COVID 19 quick tests at the Westbury New Cassel Family Health Center on Thursday, May 14, 2020 in Westbury Credit: Howard Schnapp

Newsday is providing all readers with access to this breaking news blog on important developments about the coronavirus and our community.

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Bellone: Declines in hospitalizations and ICU beds for virus

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said hospitalizations in Suffolk for COVID-19 went down again, after a small spike.

Based on data from May 12, Bellone said that number, which had increased by 10, came down again and is back to 575 patients being treated for the virus.

He said there was also a significant decrease in intensive care beds used by virus patients, coming down by 31 to 183 – going below 200 for the first time in weeks.  

No numbers were available on those testing positive. But he said hot spot testing, showing a 35.5% infection rate compared to the county’s overall 31 %, shows “The spread is still there but is does continue to narrow.”

Bellone said recent second waves of the virus seen around the world upon reopening prove the necessity of having a strong testing and contact tracing program so the specific areas where people get infected can be identified and targeted.

He also said the county has now distributed more than 4.7 million pieces of personal protection equipment to the county’s medical facilities and first responders. --NEWSDAY STAFF

Watch Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone's live press briefing:

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Watch Gov. Andrew Cuomo's press briefing:

Watch Nassau County Executive Laura Curran’s press briefing:

De Blasio: NYC expanding coronavirus testing criteria

New York City is expanding its criteria for who should get tested for the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Thursday.

Individuals who should get tested, de Blasio said, now include anyone exhibiting symptoms of the virus, even if they are not older or have preexisting conditions. Anyone who has had close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 patient and workers in nursing homes, shelters and adult care facilities should also get tested, even if they do not have any symptoms, he said.

De Blasio also said that there have been 100 cases of an inflammatory syndrome that is potentially linked to the coronavirus. About half - 55 – of those children tested positive for the virus or its antibodies, he said.

The mayor also announced a decline in all three of the indicators used to determine whether the city’s coronavirus shutdown restrictions should be loosened.

“Three for three. A perfect day, NYC,” de Blasio said. – NEWSDAY STAFF

De Blasio: NYC expected to lose another $7B in tax revenue due to pandemic
New York City is expected to lose around $7 billion in tax revenue over the next year – on top of the same amount lost since the coronavirus crisis began in March, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Thursday morning on CNN.

De Blasio said a $17 billion bailout over two years, which is included in a $3 trillion stimulus package proposed by House Democrats, is “a very realistic figure.”

“I guarantee you, and I hate saying it, the lost revenue alone over the next few years will likely be $17 billion,” de Blasio said. “This is just getting us back to the point where we can run our government, provide the basic services, keep the people who have been the heroes in this crisis.”

De Blasio has cautioned that the city would need to furlough or lay off municipal workers absent a bailout. – MATTHEW CHAYES

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