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COVID-19 hospitalizations in New York State continue to decline, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo  says

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo holds a COVID-19 briefing

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo holds a COVID-19 briefing in New York City on July 1. Credit: Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo/Kevin P. Coughlin

COVID-19 hospitalizations in New York State continued to decline to the lowest point since March, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Saturday.

Hospitalization numbers fell statewide by four to 646, the lowest point since March 18, Cuomo said. The state also discharged 80 people from hospitals on Friday.

COVID-19 patients in intensive care also fell to 149, which is the lowest point since March 16, Cuomo said. Intubations increased by one, to 94 patients.

The state recorded 750 new coronavirus cases, including 104 on Long Island, for a total of 411,200 cases since March. The positive testing rate for COVID-19 was 1.05% on Friday, which has remained consistent since the beginning of June.

Long Island’s positive testing rate remained at 0.9% while New York City’s rate increased slightly from 1.1% on Thursday to 1.2% on Friday.

The state recorded 10 new deaths, bringing the statewide death toll to 25,103 since the pandemic began. There was one new death in Suffolk County.

"New York State's numbers continue to show progress in the midst of alarming increases in COVID-19 cases throughout the country and a renewed need to ensure compliance with state guidance here at home," Cuomo said in a statement. "Yesterday's numbers show New York's hospitalizations continue to decrease and its rate of positive tests remains low, but it's essential that we stay vigilant by social distancing, wearing masks and washing our hands as this pandemic is far from over."

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Nassau County reached a second consecutive day of record-low COVID-19-related hospitalizations, with 35 patients, County Executive Laura Curran said.

"This is a 98% decrease since our peak in April when our hospitals saw between 2,000-2,500 patients each day for two weeks straight," Curran said.

In addition, Curran noted that it’s been almost a week since the last COVID-related death in Nassau County.

In the past 24 hours, Nassau tested 5,712 residents, and 55 — less than 1% — came back positive.

"I am very proud of our residents, businesses and health care professionals for this tremendous progress," Curran said. "This progress has come with immense sacrifice and pain for so many, so let’s continue to keep the virus at bay with the measures we know work — social distance and wear a mask — even on nice weekends like this.”

Suffolk County reported 49 new cases, bringing its total to 42,915. 

On Saturday, New York City reported 49 new cases, one new hospitalization and three new deaths, as of Thursday, the latest such count available. 

The city had 220,172 cumulative cases, 18,849 confirmed deaths, and 4,627 additional deaths, likely from the virus, according to the city health department.

Northwell Health, meanwhile, said Saturday its number of COVID-19 patients dropped to 79 at the 19 hospitals it owns and operates.

That figure represents the lowest number since the pandemic’s peak in April, when Northwell had about 3,400 coronavirus patients.

Northwell said no patients died of COVID-19 over the last 24 hours and three were admitted for the virus systemwide. Two of the three were on Long Island.

North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset and Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park were the only two Northwell hospitals with at least 10 COVID-19 patients.

With Matthew Chayes and David Reich-Hale

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