TODAY'S PAPER
49° Good Evening
49° Good Evening
NewsHealthCoronavirus

Infections edge up in hot spots but Cuomo says state has made progress

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo provides a coronavirus update

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo provides a coronavirus update during a news conference at the State Capitol in Albany last week. Credit: Office of Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo/Mike Groll

New York has made "progress" in reducing the COVID-19 infection rate in six "microcluster" areas, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Sunday, even as figures show the rate has ticked up slightly in the past couple days.

The overall infection rate in hot spots in Brooklyn, Queens and Orange, Rockland, Steuben and Chemung counties was 3.18% Saturday, Cuomo said. That’s down from a high of 6.9% in the period of Sept. 27-Oct. 3 — a rate that prompted Cuomo to enact restrictions on Oct. 6.

Cuomo lifted some of those restrictions — including allowing all schools in Queens and some in Brooklyn to reopen — on Wednesday, when the rate was 3.2%, figures show.

"As we saw with Queens this past week, we get the numbers down, we then open up the areas," Cuomo said. "It's just math."

But Saturday’s microcluster infection rate was higher than Thursday and Friday’s rates of 2.31% and 2.58% respectively, figures show.

Cuomo has said he expects microclusters to "come and go" since "the numbers are so small" that a minor rise in cases would create an uptick in statistics.

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Still, New York’s overall infection rate is 1.35%, including those microclusters and 1.06% excluding them, as the rest of the nation experiences a record surge of cases. There were more than 85,000 new cases nationally Friday, the most recorded in one day.

"So far, we are defying the national tide," Cuomo said.

Statewide, there were 1,104 new cases reported Saturday and 12 deaths, Cuomo said. Hospitalizations dropped by 30, to 1,015. 118 people were intubated in an intensive care unit, he said.

The microclusters saw 528 new cases Saturday out of 16,614 tests, Cuomo said.

The highest rates were in Chemung and Steuben. Chemung's rate was 12%, up from 4.6% Friday, state data shows, Steuben's rate was 6%, up from 4.4%.

Brooklyn’s red zone infection rate was 4.4%, down from 5.8% early this month, but up from 2.5% on Thursday, figures show. Queens' two yellow zones had 2.9% and 2.5%, up from 2.4% and 1.7% the day before.

Rockland's rate was 2.8%, down from 4.5% earlier this month but up from 1.23% Friday, according to state figures. Orange, where the infection rate was 12.4% early this month, had a rate of 1.2%, lower than the Friday figure of 2.8%, figures show.

On Long Island, the infection rate was 1.3%, down from 1.6% on Friday, according to state figures. Nassau County had 109 new cases and Suffolk County had 101.

States/regions in red are included on New York's travel advisory list as of Oct. 27, 2020. Guam and Puerto Rico, not pictured, are also on the list.

There have been 777 cases reported by schools since Sep. 8, including 581 students and 196 teachers and staff, according to the state’s school report card. 653 cases were in public schools and 124 were in private and charter schools. Labs have reported 887 cases of students between ages 5 and 17 since Sep. 1.

Nassau had 72 COVID-19 hospitalizations, with 19 in ICUs and 11 on ventilators, County Executive Laura Curran said. Suffolk had 32 patients hospitalized, with four in ICUs.

Curran said Nassau has kept the virus "under control" with a "robust testing strategy that has proven key to ensuring any presence of virus is quickly identified, isolated, traced, and ultimately suppressed."

"But we cannot let our guard down, especially as more and more people turn to indoor activities as the weather gets colder," Curran said in a statement.

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Health