TODAY'S PAPER
Good Afternoon
Good Afternoon
NewsHealthCoronavirus

Parade of vehicles bring celebration to Hofstra master's degree grad in Glen Cove

Jessica Reynolds, a one-time EMT from Glen Cove

Jessica Reynolds, a one-time EMT from Glen Cove who just earned her master's degree in accounting from Hofstra, receives a suprise graduation parade from her friends and family.  Credit: Jeff Bachner

Like thousands of graduates on Long Island, Jessica Reynolds of Glen Cove can’t walk across a stage to accept a hard-earned degree as her family and friends cheer her on.

But the 23-year-old recipient of a Hofstra University master’s degree and former emergency medical technician did get the second part of that celebration Sunday — the day she was to graduate — as her friends, family, former co-workers and a parade of first responder vehicles rolled past her home.

“It was nice to see everyone, especially people from EMS who I used to volunteer with,” she said after the graduation parade in front of her Coles Street home to mark her completion of a master's degree in accounting. “It was a nice surprise to see everyone.”

She sported a blue graduation gown and waved to supporters like a guest of honor as Glen Cove fire trucks, police cars and an ambulance rolled past in front of a cavalcade of cars festooned with balloons and carrying her friends and family at about 1 p.m.

Reynolds said Hofstra’s graduation has been postponed until August.

She said she had seen other celebrations on the news with similar social distancing techniques for birthdays and other milestones as people try to maintain social interaction but avoid the spread of coronavirus. So, she sort of hinted at it to her sister, Amanda, who ran with the idea, her mother said.

“It went great,” said Denise Reynolds, Jessica’s mother. “She said to her older sister that it would be nice if we could do a graduation parade because she couldn’t walk for her master’s degree. So, my daughter put it together.”

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Relatives came from as far away as Miller Place. The convoy included about 20 cars and the official vehicles and it wound down McLoughlin Street and up Coles Street where Reynolds stood on her front lawn in front of a sign congratulating her.

“We did it to show her we are proud of her and her accomplishments,” Denise Reynolds said. “It was a big surprise.”

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Health