TODAY'S PAPER
Good Afternoon
Good Afternoon
NewsHealthCoronavirus

Nassau DA launches hotline to report possible coronavirus scams

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas speaks in

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas speaks in Syosset in early March.   Credit: Shelby Knowles

Nassau County officials have set up a hotline to report possible scams launched by people hoping to profit illegally off concerns over the coronavirus outbreak.

New schemes have popped up recently, including fake tests and cures for the disease that has infected hundreds of thousands of people in the country, said Nassau District Attorney Madeline Singas, who established the hotline Friday to report them to Singas’ Financial Crimes Bureau.

Other bogus products include vaccines, masks, sanitizers and cleaning products.

“With many people stuck at home and using the internet and social media more frequently, scammers are cashing in by trying to steal money, personal information, or to sell bogus medications,” Singas said in a news release. “We urge anyone who believes they have been a victim of a scam to contact our hotline for assistance.”

The Nassau County District Attorney Coronavirus Scam Hotline is 516-571-3505, and reports can be emailed to info@nassauda.org.

“All calls and emails will remain confidential to the extent allowed by law,” the news release said.

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Singas said some scams are old schemes but with an updated coronavirus component. They have shown up as online order and charity scams, fake health insurance and mortgage relief, and fake solicitations for money through email, texts or phone calls from people acting as employees of federal agencies.

“Do not respond to these communications by clicking on any links, responding to any questions, or providing any personal information,” the release said. “If you do so, a hacker may try to hijack your computer, steal data, or install malware. They can also freeze your computer and change your password and demand ransom to unlock it.”

A note to our community:

As a public service, this article is available for all. Newsday readers support our strong local journalism by subscribing.  Please show you value this important work by becoming a subscriber now.

SUBSCRIBE

Cancel anytime

Health