+-
Patrick Linehan, 66, seen here outside his Amityville (Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Patrick Linehan, 66, seen here outside his Amityville home, says he probably would have died had he not gotten the PSA blood test to detect his prostate cancer in 2008. (Nov. 9, 2011)

Debates over the value of mammograms and PSA tests

A government-appointed panel two years ago recommended women beginning at age 50, not 40, get mammograms every other year, instead of every year. In October, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a 16-member group of outside primary-care experts, released a draft recommendation that calls for not routinely giving healthy men 50 and older the prostate-specific antigen blood test. These individuals explain their stance on these tests.

Lorelei Galardi, 49, seen at her home in
(Credit: Gordon M. Grant)

Lorelei Galardi, 49, seen at her home in Southampton, was diagnosed with a high-grade form of breast cancer after her first mammogram at 43 years old. She then had a mastectomy, a surgery that removed the cancerous breast. (Nov. 12, 2011)

Madison Pauly, 18, of Oakdale, says fewer medical
(Credit: AP )

Madison Pauly, 18, of Oakdale, says fewer medical tests for people of low cancer risk might mean money saved for everyone and better care for those who might be saved from cancer. (Nov. 18, 2011)

Patrick Linehan, 66, seen here outside his Amityville
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Patrick Linehan, 66, seen here outside his Amityville home, says he probably would have died had he not gotten the PSA blood test to detect his prostate cancer in 2008. (Nov. 9, 2011)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.