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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is a private, (Credit: CSHL Archives)

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is a private, nonprofit institution where more than 400 scientists conduct research in cancer, neurobiology, plant genetics, and bioinformatics. CSHL is one of eight National Cancer Institute-designated basic research centers in the U.S. and the only one in the tristate area. It is currently constructing six science buildings in the new Hillside Campus.

History of Cold Spring Harbor Lab

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is a private,
(Credit: CSHL Archives)

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is a private, nonprofit institution where more than 400 scientists conduct research in cancer, neurobiology, plant genetics, and bioinformatics. CSHL is one of eight National Cancer Institute-designated basic research centers in the U.S. and the only one in the tristate area. It is currently constructing six science buildings in the new Hillside Campus.

Bruce Stillman, Ph.D., President of Cold Spring Harbor
(Credit: Photo by Connie Brukin)

Bruce Stillman, Ph.D., President of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Dr. Stillman and his colleagues have been working to purify a protein complex (ORC) that is required to trigger DNA replication in complex organisms including humans.

Dr. Lakshmi Muthuswamy, Dr. Michael Wigler, and Dr.
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Dr. Lakshmi Muthuswamy, Dr. Michael Wigler, and Dr. Jonathan Sebat, the autism team in 2007 at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Cold Spring, New York.

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Dr. Scott Lowe, professor at CSHL in the
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Dr. Scott Lowe, professor at CSHL in the fields of modulation of apoptosis; chemosensitivity; senescence by cancer genes, working to understand how cancer genes control apoptosis and senescence in normal cells, and how mutations that disrupt these processes impact tumor development and therapy. Much of his research approach stems from efforts to understand p53 tumor suppressor gene action.

Dr. James D. Watson, Chancellor of Cold Spring
(Credit: Photo by Max Gerber)

Dr. James D. Watson, Chancellor of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

Dr. Greg Hannon created the first library of
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Dr. Greg Hannon created the first library of human RNA interference (RNAi) clones, which enabled a wide variety of users to rapidly identify and validate target genes involved in disease. In 2005, Hannon, Lowe, and Scott Powers found that a recently discovered class of genetic regulators called microRNAs could act as bona fide human cancer-causing oncogenes.

Dr. Michael Wigler. In 1981, Dr. Wigler and
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Dr. Michael Wigler. In 1981, Dr. Wigler and his collaborators cloned the first human tumor-derived oncogene, H-ras. Wigler later identified a key oncogenic (cancer-causing) mutation in H-ras and discovered that the distantly related budding yeast also had RAS genes.

Dr Leemor Joshua-Tor, Arne Stenlund and their colleagues
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Dr Leemor Joshua-Tor, Arne Stenlund and their colleagues in 2000 determined the shape and biochemical properties of a protein required for papillomavirus DNA replication. Papillomavirus infection is associated with virtually every case of human cervical cancer.

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Dr. Robert Malinow is Professor of Neuroscience at
(Credit: Photo by Bill Geddes)

Dr. Robert Malinow is Professor of Neuroscience at CSHL working in the fields of neuroscience; synaptic transmission; synaptic plasticity; learning and memory and how they might apply to diseases such as Alzheimer s and Parkinson s and other brain disorders.

Each year, nearly 8,000 scientists from over 50
(Credit: Photo by Miriam Chua)

Each year, nearly 8,000 scientists from over 50 countries attend one or more of the dozens of meetings held at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). The annual CSHL Symposium on Quantitative Biology addresses a wealth of topics and is one of the most prestigious meetings in the field of biology.

Richard Roberts received the Nobel Prize for Physiology
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

Richard Roberts received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1993 from Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden.In 1973, Rich Roberts begins to purify large numbers of restriction enzymes, the molecular "scissors" that cut DNA at specific sequences. His group discovers many of the restriction enzymes used in recombinant DNA technology.

Carol Greider, pictured here working at CSHL in
(Credit: Photo by Margot Bennett)

Carol Greider, pictured here working at CSHL in 1993, cloned the gene that encodes the RNA component of the telomerase enzyme.In 1990, Carol Greider cloned a gene that encodes a component of an enzyme-telomerase-that maintains the integrity of the tips of chromosomes (telomeres). In 1992, Carol Greider, Bruce Futcher, and their colleagues showed an association between telomere shortening and cell aging. This discovery suggested a possible reason for the unchecked proliferation of cancer cells.

Robert Martienssen and Barbara McClintock examining experimental maize
(Credit: Photo by Tim Mulligan)

Robert Martienssen and Barbara McClintock examining experimental maize plants in 1989.

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Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock, with Carl XVI Gustaf,
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

Nobel laureate Barbara McClintock, with Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden. McClintock was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1983 for her discoveries concerning controlling elements, commonly known as "jumping genes."

In 1981, Mike Wigler and his collaborators clone
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

In 1981, Mike Wigler and his collaborators clone the first human tumor-derived oncogene, H-ras. Wigler later identifies a key oncogenic (cancer-causing) mutation in H-ras and discovers that the distantly related budding yeast also has RAS genes. Michael Wigler (left) and Yakov Gluzman at the Construction and Use of Mammalian Vectors meeting, 1980.

Members of the CSHL Tumor Virus group in
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

Members of the CSHL Tumor Virus group in 1973. Left to right: Jane Flint, Terri Grodzicker, Phil Sharp, Joe Sambrook.

Dr. Francis Crick and Dr. James Watson. In
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

Dr. Francis Crick and Dr. James Watson. In 1962 they received the Nobel Prize with Maurice Wilkins in 1962 for the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA.

An undated photo of Dr. Alfred Hershey in
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

An undated photo of Dr. Alfred Hershey in his lab. In 1952, Alfred Hershey and Martha Chase carried out the classic "Waring blender" experiment which reinforced the idea that the genetic material is DNA, not protein. In 1969, Alfred Hershey was awarded the Nobel Prize for work he conducted on his own, with Martha Chase, and in collaboration with Max Delbruck and Salvador Luria (who received the prize along with Hershey).

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In 1951, At the CSH Symposium, Barbara McClintock
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

In 1951, At the CSH Symposium, Barbara McClintock describes "controlling elements" which she found can switch other genes on and off as a consequence of their movement within the genome. McClintock was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1983 for her discoveries concerning controlling elements, commonly known as "jumping genes."

The first building erected by the Carnegie Institute
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

The first building erected by the Carnegie Institute of Washington in 1904, today serves as the Genentech Center for the History of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at CSHL and holds extensive library materials and archives. This photo was taken in 1905.

Jones Laboratory, erected in 1893, served as the
(Credit: Courtesy of CSHL Archives)

Jones Laboratory, erected in 1893, served as the first laboratory building at CSHL, and is the oldest biological laboratory in continuous use in the United States and a historical landmark.