TODAY'S PAPER
66° Good Evening
66° Good Evening
NewsNation

GOP cold to Obama's call for health care talks

WASHINGTON - Republicans gave a chilly reception Monday to President Barack Obama's invitation to discuss health care in a bipartisan, televised setting later this month, part of the White House effort to revive the stalled legislation.

The House and Senate GOP leaders said Obama and his fellow Democrats must shelve their long-debated health care bill, which was on the verge of becoming law until Republican Scott Brown won a special Senate election in Massachusetts last month. The White House says Obama has no plans to do so but is willing to hear Republicans' ideas.

Rep. Darrell Issa of California, the top Republican on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said Monday that the first question for Obama should be: "Did you lie about moving forward on malpractice reform?"

He was alluding to the president's earlier remarks about possibly curbing malpractice lawsuits, which is not included in the health bills passed separately by House and Senate Democrats in December.

In the first major move to jump-start his health care agenda after his party's loss of a filibuster-proof Senate majority, Obama on Sunday invited GOP and Democratic leaders to discuss possible compromises in a half-day, televised gathering on Feb. 25.

It comes amid widespread complaints that Democrats' efforts so far have been too partisan and secretive.

The meeting's prospects for success are far from clear. GOP leaders insisted on starting from scratch. But many Democrats want to use their party's remaining parliamentary muscle to enact their plans with as few changes as possible.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), said his earlier efforts to reach out to Republicans "did not result in any serious follow-through to work together in a bipartisan fashion."

Obama told CBS' Katie Couric that he and the leaders of both parties will "go through systematically all the best ideas that are out there and move it forward."

Asked whether he was willing to start from square one, the president said he wants "to look at the Republican ideas that are out there. If we can go step by step through a series of these issues and arrive at some agreements, then procedurally, there's no reason why we can't do it a lot faster than the process took last year."

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

News Photos and Videos