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NATIONAL BRIEFS


TEXAS: Exonerated, 30 years later

A man declared innocent Tuesday after 30 years in prison had at least two chances to make parole and be set free - if only he would admit he was a sex offender. But Cornelius Dupree Jr. refused to do so, doggedly maintaining his innocence in a 1979 rape and robbery, in the process serving more time for a crime he didn't commit than any other Texas inmate exonerated by DNA evidence. "Whatever your truth is, you have to stick with it," Dupree, 51, said after a Dallas judge overturned his conviction.


MASSACHUSETTS: Shah's son takes own life

The youngest son of the late shah of Iran was found dead Tuesday at his home in Boston, apparently a suicide. "Once again, we are joined with mothers, father and relatives of so many victims of these dark times for our country [Iran]," the shah's oldest son, Reza Pahlavi, wrote on his website in announcing the death of his brother, Alireza Pahlavi, 44. He died of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound.


WASHINGTON: Scoffing at snub by Iran

The State Department is belittling Iran's offer to let some countries, but not the United States, visit its nuclear facilities, calling the offer a "magical mystery tour." Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said Tuesday that the offer is no substitute for Iran fully cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency to prove that its nuclear program is strictly for peaceful purposes. While Crowley did not urge others to decline the invitation, he did say there is no reason for any country to attend.


MARYLAND: Mikulski sets Senate mark

When Barbara Mikulski was sworn in as a U.S. senator in 1987, she entered what she described as "a guys' club," where senators socialized in a gym off-limits to her and the only other female senator then, Republican Nancy Kassebaum of Kansas. Mikulski, 74, a Democrat, becomes Wednesday the longest-serving woman in the history of the U.S. Senate. She was never much of a jock anyway, she said. "For us, not about whether we had a locker room," Mikulski said in an Associated Press interview. "It's whether we had a committee room, and we now have them."

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