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NATIONAL BRIEFS

MINNESOTA: Gunman kills 2, and himself

A gunman who opened fire inside a Minneapolis sign company was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound Thursday and was among "several" people killed in the incident, police said. When pressed to say how many, Deputy Police Chief Kris Arneson said only that police were still investigating. Police had previously said two people were killed and four wounded in the shootings at Accent Signage Systems. Hennepin County Medical Center was treating three people from the scene, all in critical condition.


CONNECTICUT: Slain intruder was his son

A man fatally shot a masked teenager in self-defense outside his neighbor's house during what appeared to be a late-night burglary attempt, only to discover it was his son, state police said. Police said Tyler Giuliano, 15, was shot about 1 a.m. Thursday in New Fairfield, just north of Danbury. A woman who was alone in her house believed someone was breaking in, and called the teen's father next door, and he grabbed a gun and went outside to investigate, police said. He confronted someone wearing a black ski mask and black clothing and fired his gun when the person went at him with a shiny weapon in his hand, police said. The father, Jeffrey Giuliano, is a fifth-grade teacher.


NATIONWIDE: Turtles spreading salmonella

They're cute, but potentially deadly. Tiny pet turtles, some the size of a quarter, are to blame for six salmonella outbreaks that have sickened nearly 200 people, mostly children. The Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of turtles with shells less than four inches long in 1975, an attempt to keep them away from kids when small pet turtles were all the rage. The agency found that kids couldn't resist kissing the toylike reptiles or placing them in their mouths, sometimes contaminating themselves with the salmonella commonly found on turtles. Illnesses have been reported in 30 states since last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A thriving black market keeps churning out the small pets, which are often raised on turtle farms and sold at flea markets, on the Web or in stores.

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