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Sandy causes candidates to change venues

PENSACOLA, Fla. -- Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney dangled a plea for bipartisanship before early voters in Florida Saturday as President Barack Obama worked to nail down tiny New Hampshire's four electoral votes.

With just 10 days left in a tight race, Hurricane Sandy had both campaigns ripping up itineraries as they worked to maximize voter turnout and avoid any appearance of putting politics ahead of public safety.

By Saturday night, both campaigns had canceled events and adjusted travel schedules. The White House said that Obama was canceling planned events tomorrow night in Northern Virginia and the following morning in Colorado Springs because of Sandy. "We're taking this day by day just like the administration is and just like state and local authorities are," said Obama campaign spokeswoman Jen Psaki.

Romney lost a day of campaigning in Virginia, when he canceled Sunday's events to avoid diverting resources from storm preparation on the advice of GOP Gov. Bob McDonnell. Instead, he'll return to Ohio and join running mate Paul Ryan on a bus tour.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said he's scrapping his plans to campaign for Romney in Nevada on Tuesday as Sandy barreled toward his state.

Vice President Joe Biden's rally in Virginia Beach, Va., was canceled to keep emergency responders focused on "ensuring the safety of people who might be impacted by the storm," an email from the campaign said.

The storm could also make it difficult for voters to cast in-person early ballots, a part of the Obama campaign strategy.

Earlier, the campaigns pressed every possible angle.

Romney campaigned across Florida with a pledge to "build bridges" with the other party. Meanwhile, he picked up support from the Des Moines Register, the newspaper's first endorsement of a GOP presidential candidate in 40 years.

Obama hauled his campaign to low-tax New Hampshire, appealing to voters by hammering Romney's record as Massachusetts governor. With AP

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