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The search for Amelia Earhart's plane

An undated file photo shows American aviator Amelia

An undated file photo shows American aviator Amelia Earhart. A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago? Photo Credit: AP

A $2.2 million expedition is underway to solve the mystery of what happened to famous aviator Amelia Earhart's plane when it disappeared over 75 years ago.

An undated picture taken in the 1930's shows
Photo Credit: Getty Images

An undated picture taken in the 1930's shows American female aviator Amelia Earhart at the controls of her plane. Seventy-five years after Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific, a research team is setting off with high hopes of resolving the mystery surrounding the pioneering aviatrix.

An undated file photo shows American aviator Amelia
Photo Credit: AP

An undated file photo shows American aviator Amelia Earhart. A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago?

In a 1937 file photo, aviator Amelia Earhart
Photo Credit: AP

In a 1937 file photo, aviator Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, pose in front of their twin-engine Lockheed Electra in Los Angeles prior to their historic flight in which Earhart was attempting to become first female pilot to circle the globe.

Amelia Earhart waves from the Electra before taking
Photo Credit: AP

Amelia Earhart waves from the Electra before taking off from Los Angeles, Ca. (March 10, 1937)

Wolfgang Burnside controls a remote-operated vehicle from the
Photo Credit: AP

Wolfgang Burnside controls a remote-operated vehicle from the deck of a ship in Honolulu. Cameras and lights on the vehicle will be used to search the ocean floor during a month-long voyage to find plane wreckage from Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra, which disappeared over the South Pacific 75 years ago. (July 1, 2012)

Ric Gillespie, right, founder of The International Group
Photo Credit: AP

Ric Gillespie, right, founder of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, watches equipment testing alongside Wolfgang Burnside from aboard a ship at port in Honolulu. Gillespie is leading a month-long voyage to find plane wreckage from Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra, which disappeared over the South Pacific 75 years ago. (July 1, 2012)

Evan Tanner, left, an assistant project manager for
Photo Credit: AP

Evan Tanner, left, an assistant project manager for Phoenix International, watches as an autonomous underwater vehicle is tested in Honolulu. The underwater mapping vehicle is part of a month-long voyage to find plane wreckage from Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra, which disappeared over the South Pacific 75 years ago. (July 1, 2012)

A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally
Photo Credit: AP

A $2.2 million expedition is hoping to finally solve one of America's most enduring mysteries: What exactly happened to famed aviator Amelia Earhart when she went missing over the South Pacific 75 years ago? (July 2, 2012)

University of Hawaii ship Kaimikai-O-Kanaloa is anchored at
Photo Credit: AP

University of Hawaii ship Kaimikai-O-Kanaloa is anchored at harbor in Honolulu. The ship will be used for of a month-long voyage to attempt to find plane wreckage from Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra, which disappeared over the South Pacific 75 years ago. (July 1, 2012)

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