TODAY'S PAPER
53° Good Evening
53° Good Evening
NewsNew York

A look at all the mayoral candidates in Tuesday's primary

(Getty)

(Getty) Credit: (Getty)

Joe Lhota (Republican)

BACKGROUND
Lhota, 58, was a budget czar and deputy mayor under former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and head of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, where his tenure included the recovery from superstorm Sandy. In the private sector, Lhota was an investment banker and corporate executive at Cablevision, which owns Newsday.
A native of the Bronx, Lhota moved with his family to Lindenhurst on Long Island when he was a sixth-grader. Lhota has degrees from Harvard Business School and Georgetown University. He is married to Tamra Lhota, and they live in Brooklyn Heights with their daughter, Kathryn.

ISSUES
Unlike almost every other candidate for mayor — Democrat or Republican — Lhota has ruled out back pay for members of the municipal labor unions, saying the city cannot afford the raises without jeopardizing the city’s financial health. Lhota says he’ll build on the work of his two predecessors, essentially maintaining the status quo on stop and frisk and city schools. He has ruled out tax increases. He wants the city to take control of the bridges and tunnels from the MTA.

John Catsimatidis (Republican)

BACKGROUND
Catsimatidis, 64, of the Upper East Side, is a billionaire who owns supermarkets and oil and real estate concerns. He proudly recounts his rags-to-riches story: growing up poor, a Greek immigrant to America, attending public schools and building his Gristedes grocery chain from one store. He attended New York University but didn’t graduate. He lives with his wife, Margo, and one of his two children, John Jr. His daughter, Andrea Cox, is married to former President Richard Nixon’s grandson Christopher.

ISSUES
Catsimatidis has been a stalwart defender of Ray Kelly as NYPD police commissioner against criticism that the department’s stop-and-frisk tactic amounts to unconstitutional discrimination. If elected, Catsimatidis says he’d protect law-abiding New Yorkers from “the hoodlums” and wants Kelly to remain top cop. Catsimatidis has proposed the construction of a monorail to ease commuting, the expansion of vocational public schooling because “not everyone can be a nuclear scientist,” and a moratorium on taxes.

George McDonald (Republican)

BACKGROUND
A longtime apparel executive, McDonald, 69, is the founder of the Doe Fund, which helps poor people find work. The program — which he began after a homeless woman froze to death outside Grand Central Terminal — has helped 18,000 people, his campaign says. McDonald attended Fairleigh Dickinson University but did not graduate. He lives in Manhattan with his wife, Harriet. A longtime advocate for ex-convicts, McDonald has chaired the state’s Independent Committee on Reentry and Employment and sits on Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s Work for Success Executive Committee.

ISSUES
McDonald’s platform is an outgrowth of his charitable work helping the impoverished — to help everyone find a place to live and a job to pay for it. He’s a supporter of Michael Bloomberg, from Bloomberg’s stewardship of the NYPD to the bike-sharing program, Citi Bike. In a debate on Aug. 9, McDonald said the city “has never been in better shape” and slammed mayoral contenders who are “about tearing down what Mayor Bloomberg has done.” In debates and interviews, McDonald has attacked Democrat Anthony Weiner more directly and bluntly than any other candidate, for Weiner’s sexting scandals.

Bill de Blasio (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
De Blasio, 52, was raised in Massachusetts and now lives in Park Slope, Brooklyn. He and his wife, Chirlane McCray, have a daughter and son, both teenagers. De Blasio graduated from New York University and received a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He worked for Mayor David Dinkins’ administration and at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as a regional director, and he managed Hillary Clinton’s successful 2000 Senate campaign. He was elected to the City Council in 2001 and to the public advocate seat in 2009.

ISSUES
De Blasio seeks to limit economic development tax breaks and establish a city job-creation coordinator to manage workforce development programs, raise taxes on city residents earning $500,000 or more to fund universal prekindergarten, expand the public transportation system in the outer boroughs, replace Ray Kelly as police commissioner and direct the NYPD to limit arrests for marijuana violations, among other plans. As public advocate, de Blasio filed a lawsuit to keep Long Island College Hospital open, fought for compensation for first responders after the 9/11 terror attacks and created a “worst landlords watchlist.”

Bill Thompson (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Thompson, 60, was city comptroller from 2002 through 2009, when he challenged Michael Bloomberg for mayor, unsuccessfully. Outspent 14 to 1, Thompson still came within 5 percentage points. In 2010, he became a managing director of investment bank Siebert Brandford Shank & Co. Son of Brooklyn politician William Thompson Sr., Thompson has been a president of the now-defunct Board of Education, chairman of the Battery Park City Authority and deputy borough president of Brooklyn. A Tufts University graduate, he lives in Harlem with his wife, Elsie McCabe Thompson, and two stepchildren. He’s also father of an adult daughter, Jennifer.

ISSUES
Thompson supports mayoral control of the city schools, but he has proposed ceding the mayor’s majority of a panel overseeing the Department of Education. He has proposed eliminating performance goals — which critics say are tantamount to quotas — for police officers as an antidote to what he sees as racially discriminatory excesses of the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk tactic. Thompson also is proposing giving a free school lunch to every public school student — amid a call by Bloomberg to raise the price by 25 cents a meal.

Christine Quinn (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Quinn, 47, was raised in Glen Cove and now lives in Manhattan’s Chelsea with her wife, attorney Kim Catullo. A graduate of Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., Quinn worked with the Housing Justice Campaign, managed City Councilman Tom Duane’s 1991 campaign and served as his chief of staff. She also was executive director of the Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project. She was elected to the City Council in 1999 and became council speaker in 2006.

ISSUES
Quinn hopes to build 40,000 new middle-income apartments in the next decade, increase the number of police officers by 1,600 in the next three years, double the city’s exports by 2020, create an office of innovation and establish a program to mentor teachers, among other ideas. She has denounced excessive police use of stop-and-frisk tactics, but said she would keep Ray Kelly as commissioner. As speaker, she takes credit for helping to pass seven on-time, balanced budgets, and she fought to prevent teacher layoffs and firehouse closures. She has been criticized for voting to overturn term limits and allow Mayor Michael Bloomberg to win a third term in 2009.

Anthony Weiner (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Weiner, 49, a Brooklyn native, began his political career as an aide to then-Rep. Charles Schumer. Elected to the City Council in 1991 from Brooklyn, Weiner served until 1998, when he won a seat in the House of Representatives covering parts of Brooklyn and Queens. He ran unsuccessfully in 2005 for mayor. In June 2011, he resigned from Congress over a sexting-and-lying scandal. Weiner then founded a consulting firm that netted him at least a quarter of a million dollars. He’s a graduate of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh. He lives with his wife, Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, and their toddler son, Jordan, in the Flatiron section of Manhattan.

ISSUES
Weiner has focused on “the middle class and those struggling to make it.” Styling himself “the ideas candidate,” Weiner has published on his campaign website 125 ideas for improving the city — ideas drowned out by coverage of his sexting habit. He wants police officers to wear tiny video surveillance cameras to monitor performance, make municipal employees contribute to their health care costs, help Catholic schools stay open and launch ferry service in all five boroughs. He also has proposed a citywide, single-payer health care system for uninsured and under-insured New Yorkers.

John Liu (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Liu, 46, of Flushing, has been the city comptroller since 2010, succeeding his now rival for the Democratic mayoral nomination, Bill Thompson. Elected in 2001, Liu was a city councilman representing Flushing for eight years before winning the comptroller race. Liu, born in Taiwan, calls himself an example of the American dream, joking that he has “made in Taiwan” stamped on his neck. Liu attended Binghamton University, graduating with a degree in mathematical physics, and worked as an actuary at the firm PricewaterhouseCoopers before going into politics. He lives with his wife, Jenny, and their son, Joey.

ISSUES
Liu has said he would award some back pay to municipal workers, who have gone years without raises. He says he’d abolish the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk tactic, raise taxes on New Yorkers making more than $500,000 a year and raise the minimum wage to $11.50. On Aug. 5, his bid struck a major setback when the city’s Campaign Finance Board denied him matching funds over fundraising irregularities that have dogged his campaign and have led to the criminal convictions of two top campaign officials: his campaign treasurer and a longtime fundraiser.

Sal Albanese (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Albanese, 63, was born in Italy and raised in Brooklyn. He and his wife, Lorraine, live in Bay Ridge and have two daughters. He graduated from York College, received a master’s degree from New York University and a law degree from Brooklyn Law School. He worked as a public school teacher and was elected to the City Council in 1982. He served four terms and ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1997. He then worked in the legal and financial fields, most recently as managing director of the firm Mesirow Financial.

ISSUES
Albanese hopes to consolidate the Head Start program and prekindergarten into a single city agency to limit waste and increase access, hire 3,800 more police officers and reform stop and frisk through academy training, and lobby for city control of the MTA, among other plans. He has refused contributions from registered lobbyists and developers.

Erick Salgado (Democrat)

BACKGROUND
Salgado, 42, was born in the Bronx and now lives in Westerleigh, Staten Island, with his wife, Sonia, and their six children. He received an associate degree from Boricua College and a theological studies degree from La Universidad Teologica Interamericana in Elizabeth, N.J. He ran a chain of bookstore outlets in the Bronx, Staten Island and Queens and founded evangelical Pentecostal churches in Red Hook and Bensonhurst. Most recently, he was president of Radio Cantico Nuevo Inc., a radio broadcast ministry he founded.

ISSUES
Salgado plans to increase staffing in the police and fire departments, include a grade supplied by students’ parents in each public school teacher evaluation, introduce tax incentives to encourage small businesses to hire more employees and create a New York City identification card for immigrants living here illegally.
 

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

More news