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Flight 587 crash

A large section of the tailpiece of American

A large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane after the Airbus A300 crashed in the Rockaway Beach section of the Queens borough of New York Monday, Nov. 12, 2001. The tailpiece was recovered from Jamaica Bay and towed to shore. (AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella) Credit: AP/DANIEL P. DERELLA

A large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane after the Airbus A300 crashed in the Rockaways on Nov. 12, 2001. Investigators inspect the engine that fell on a house on Beach 28th Street. New York City police officers Danny Hogg, left, and Peter Connolly look over the engine that landed in a gas station in the Belle Harbor neighborhood. Photos by AP /Daniel P. Derella; Newsday/Jiro Ose and AP/Beth A. Keiser

A large section of the tailpiece of American
Credit: AP/DANIEL P. DERELLA

A large section of the tailpiece of American Airlines Flight 587 is lifted off a boat by a crane after the Airbus A300 crashed in the Rockaway Beach section of the Queens borough of New York Monday, Nov. 12, 2001. The tailpiece was recovered from Jamaica Bay and towed to shore. (AP Photo/Daniel P. Derella)

Rockaway, Queens, NY: November 13, 2001: An investigator
Credit: Newsday/Jiro Ose

Rockaway, Queens, NY: November 13, 2001: An investigator from Airbus, right, NTSB agent, middle, and FBI Bomb Tech agent, left, inspect the engine of American Airline Flight 587 fell on the house on the Beach 28th Street.

** FILE ** New York City police officers
Credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS/BETH A. KEISER

** FILE ** New York City police officers Danny Hogg, left, and Peter Connolly look over the engine from American Airlines flight 587 that landed in a gas station in the Belle Harbor neighborhood of New York in this Nov. 14, 2001 file photo. If the pilot had taken his foot off the rudder pedal, the jetliner's tail wouldn't have broken off, the plane wouldn't have plunged into a New York City neighborhood and 265 people wouldn't have died. On those details, the investigators agree. But the pilot didn't know he was putting more pressure on the tail than it could bear. Why he didn't _ and who's to blame for that _ is the subject of a bitter fight between Airbus Industrie, which made the plane, and American Airlines, which trained the pilot. That dispute is expected to play out in public Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2004 when the NTSB meets to discuss its findings.

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